Messiah's come, with joy behold

Messiah's come, with joy behold

Author: William Cowper
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

5 Messiah's come — with joy behold
The days by prophets long foretold:
Judah, thy royal sceptre's broke,
And time still proves what Jacob spoke.

6 Daniel, thy weeks are all expir'd,
The time prophetic seals requir'd;
Cut off for sins, but not his own,
Thy prince Messiah did atone.

7 The famous temple, Solomon,
Is by the latter far out-shone:
It wanted not thy glittering store,
Messiah's presence grac'd it more.

8 We see the prophecies fulfill'd
In Jesus that most wond'rous child:
His birth, his life, his death combine
To prove his character divine.

9 Jesus, thy gospel firmly stands
A blessing to these favor'd lands:
No infidel shall be our dread,
Since thou art risen from the dead.

Source: The Psalms of David: with hymns and spiritual songs: also, the catechism, confession of faith, and liturgy of the Reformed Church in the Netherlands #H6.II

Author: William Cowper

William Cowper (pronounced "Cooper"; b. Berkampstead, Hertfordshire, England, 1731; d. East Dereham, Norfolk, England, 1800) is regarded as one of the best early Romantic poets. To biographers he is also known as "mad Cowper." His literary talents produced some of the finest English hymn texts, but his chronic depression accounts for the somber tone of many of those texts. Educated to become an attorney, Cowper was called to the bar in 1754 but never practiced law. In 1763 he had the opportunity to become a clerk for the House of Lords, but the dread of the required public examination triggered his tendency to depression, and he attempted suicide. His subsequent hospitalization and friendship with Morley and Mary Unwin provided emotional st… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Messiah's come, with joy behold
Author: William Cowper
Copyright: Public Domain

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The Psalms of David #H6.II

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