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The Shining Shore

Representative Text

1 My days are gliding swiftly by,
And I, a pilgrim stranger,
Would not detain them as the fly,
Those hours of toil and danger.

Refrain:
For now we stand on Jordan's strand;
Our friends are passing over;
And just before the shining shore
We may almost discover.

2 We'll gird our loins, my brethren dear,
Our heav'nly home discerning;
Our absent Lord has left us word,
Let ev'ry lamp be burning. [Refrain]

3 Should coming days be cold and dark,
We need not cease our singing;
That perfect rest naught can molest,
Where golden harps are ringing. [Refrain]

4 Let sorrow's rudest tempest blow,
Each chord on earth to sever,
Our King says "Come!" and there's our home,
Forever, and forever, [Refrain]

Source: Victory Songs: For the Church, Sunday School and Evangelistic Services. #253

Author: David Nelson

Nelson, David, M.D., son of Henry Nelson, was born near Jonesborough, East Tennessee, Sept. 24, 1793. He graduated at Washington College, Virginia, in 1810, and took his M.D. degree at Philadelphia in 1812. He acted for some time as a surgeon in the war against Great Britain. During that time he became an infidel, but returning to the faith, he, in 1823, resigned medicine and took up theology, and subsequently became a Presbyterian Minister. He held several appointments, and founded two manual-labour colleges, one at Greenfields, and the second near Quincy, Illinois. He died Oct. 17, 1844. His hymn, "My days are gliding swiftly by" (Death Anticipated), was written in 1835, to be sung to the tune of "Lord Ullin's Daughter." It is exceedingly… Go to person page >

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Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

The Baptist Hymnal #629

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4189

Include 580 pre-1979 instances
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