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Near the cross our station taking

Translator: James W. Alexander

Alexander, James Waddell, D.D., son of Archibald Alexander, D.D., b. at Hopewell, Louisa, county of Virginia, 13 Mar., 1804, graduated at Princeton, 1820, and was successively Professor of Rhetoric at Princeton, 1833; Pastor of Duane Street Presbyterian Church, New York, 1844; Professor of Church History, Princeton, 1849; and Pastor of 5th Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York, 1851; d. at Sweetsprings, Virginia, July 31, 1859. His works include Gift to the Afflicted, Thoughts on Family Worship, and others. His Letters were published by the Rev. Dr. Hall, in 2 vols., some time after his death, and his translations were collected and published at New York in 1861, under the title, The Breaking Crucible and other Translations. Of these transla… Go to person page >

Author: Jacopone da Todi

Jacobus de Benedictis, commonly known as Jacopone, was born at Todi in Umbria, early in the 13th century, his proper name being Jacopone di Benedetti. He was descended from a noble family, and for some time led a secular life. Some remarkable circumstances which attended the violent death of his wife, led him to withdraw himself from the world, and to enter the Order of St. Francis, in which he remained as a lay brother till his death, at an advanced age, in 1306. His zeal led him to attack the religious abuses of the day. This brought him into conflict with Pope Boniface VIII., the result being imprisonment for long periods. His poetical pieces were written, some in Italian, and some in Latin, the most famous of the latter being "Cur mundu… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Near the cross our station taking
Translator: James W. Alexander
Author: Jacopone da Todi
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Near the cross our station taking. From "Near the Cross was Mary weeping," p. 1084, i., 6. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 13 of 13)

Asaph #d167

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Hymnal of the Presbyterian Church #448

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Songs of the Covenant #267

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Sparkling Jewels for the Sunday School #20

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The Christian Hymn Book #536

The Christian Hymnal #d450

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The Christian Hymnal #397

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The Christian hymnal #580

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The Sabbath Hymn and Tune Book #393b

The Sabbath Hymn Book. Baptist ed. #d686

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The Sabbath School Hymn and Tune Book #57

The Tabernacle #d199

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