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O come, let us sing to the Lord a new song

O come, let us sing to the Lord a new song

Author: John Byrom
Published in 2 hymnals

Representative Text

1 O come, let us sing to the Lord a new song,
And praise him to whom all our praises belong!
While we enter his temple with gladness and joy,
Let a psalm of thanksgiving our voices employ!
O come, to his name let us joyfully sing!
For the Lord is a great and omnipotent King;
By his word were the heavens and the host of them made,
And of the round world the foundations he laid.

2 He stilleth the waves of the boisterous sea,
And the tumults of men, more outrageous than they;
Thy goodness, O Lord! let the people confess,
Whom wars do not waste, nor proud tyrants oppress,
And devoutly contemplate thy wonderful ways,
Thou who turnest the fierceness of men to thy praise!
Then our lands in due season shall yield their increase,
And the Lord give his people the blessings of peace.


Source: A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Publick Worship #CLXI

Author: John Byrom

John Byrom was born in 1691, at Manchester, where his father was a linen-draper. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, 1708; became a Fellow of the College in 1714; took his M.A. in 1716, and then proceeded to Montpelier, where he studied medicine. He afterwards abandoned medicine, settled in London, and obtained his living by teaching a system of shorthand, which he had projected. He was elected a member of the Royal Society in 1724. He died Sept. 28, 1763. The first edition of Byrom's poems appeared in 1773, in two volumes. A more complete edition was published in 1814. Byrom did not seek publicity as an author, but wrote verses only for recreation. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O come, let us sing to the Lord a new song
Author: John Byrom
Language: English
Publication Date: 1789
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextPage Scan

A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Publick Worship #CLXI

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Publick Worship #CLXI

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