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O come, loud anthems let us sing

Representative Text

O come, loud anthems let us sing,
Loud thanks to our Almighty King.
For we our voices high should raise,
When our salvation’s Rock we praise.

Source: The Sacred Harp: the best collection of sacred songs, hymns, odes, and anthems ever offered the singing public for general use (1991 rev.) #49a

Author: Nahum Tate

Nahum Tate was born in Dublin and graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, B.A. 1672. He lacked great talent but wrote much for the stage, adapting other men's work, really successful only in a version of King Lear. Although he collaborated with Dryden on several occasions, he was never fully in step with the intellectual life of his times, and spent most of his life in a futile pursuit of popular favor. Nonetheless, he was appointed poet laureate in 1692 and royal historiographer in 1702. He is now known only for the New Version of the Psalms of David, 1696, which he produced in collaboration with Nicholas Brady. Poverty stricken throughout much of his life, he died in the Mint at Southwark, where he had taken refuge from his creditors… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O come, loud anthems let us sing, Loud thanks to our Almighty King
Title: O come, loud anthems let us sing
Author: Nahum Tate
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Source: Tate and Brady, 1698
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

PARK STREET


OLD HUNDREDTH

This tune is likely the work of the composer named here, but has also been attributed to others as shown in the instances list below. According to the Handbook to the Baptist Hymnal (1992), Old 100th first appeared in the Genevan Psalter, and "the first half of the tune contains phrases which may ha…

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SALISBURY (Haydn)


Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)

Hymnal #68

Original Sacred Harp Denson Revision 1987 Standard Melodies #49a

Spurgeon's Own Hymn Book #95c

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4749

The Greenwood Harmony (2nd ed.) #4

The Sacred Harp #49t

Text

The Sacred Harp #49a

Worship Together #22

Include 247 pre-1979 instances
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