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A Little While

Full Text

1. Oh, for the peace that floweth as a river,
Making life’s desert places bloom and smile;
Oh, for the faith to graspHeav’n’s bright forever,
Amid the shadows of earth’s little while.

2. A little while for patient vigil keeping,
To face the storm and wrestle with the strong;
A little while to sow the seed with weeping,
Then bind the sheaves and sing the harvest song.

3. A little while the earthen pitcher taking,
To wayside brooks, from far off fountains fed;
Then the parched lip its thirst forever slaking
Beside the fullness of the Fountainhead.

4. A little while to keep the oil from failing,
A little while faith’s flickering lamp to trim;
And then the Bridegroom’s coming footsteps hailing,
We’ll haste to meet Him with the bridal hymn.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #3813

Author: Mrs. T. D. Crewdson

Crewdson, Jane, née Fox, daughter of George Fox, of Perraw, Cornwall, was born at Perraw, October, 1809; married to Thomas Crewdson, of Manchester, 1836; and died at Summerlands, near Manchester, Sept. 14, 1863. During a long illness Mrs. Crewdson composed her works published as:— (1) Lays of the Reformation, 1860. (2) A Little While, and Other Poems (posthumous), 1864. (3) The Singer of Eisenach, n.d.; and (4) Aunt Jane's Verses for Children, 1851. 2nd ed. 1855, 3rd 1871. From these works nearly a dozen of her hymns have come into common use. The best known are, "O for the peace which floweth as a river," and "There is no sorrow, Lord, too light." In addition to these and others which are annotated under their respective first line… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O for the Peace which floweth like a river
Title: A Little While
Author: Mrs. T. D. Crewdson
Meter: 11.10.11.10
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

O for the peace which floweth as a river. Jane Crewdson, née Fox. [Hoping and Trusting to the end.] Published in her posthumous work, A Little While, and Other Poems, 1864, as the opening hymn of the volume, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. It is found in full or in part in a large number of hymn books in Great Britain and America, and is much esteemed as a hymn for private use.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

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The Cyber Hymnal #3813TextScoreAudio
Include 61 pre-1979 instances



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