O may our humble spirits stand

O may our humble spirits stand

Author: Isaac Watts
Tune: INFINITE DELIGHT
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

1 O may our humble spirits stand
Among them clothed in white.
The lowest place at His right hand
Is infinite delight.
How will our joy and wonder rise
When our returning King
Shall bear us homeward through the skies
On love's triumphant wing;
Shall bear us homeward through the skies
On love's triumphant wing!

2 Behold, what heav'nly prophets sang
Is now at last fulfilled,
That death should yield his ancient reign
And vanquish quite the field.
Let faith exalt her joyful voice,
And thus being to sing,
O grave, where is thy triumph now,
And where, O death, thy sting?
O grave, where is thy triumph now,
And where, O death, thy sting?

Source: The Sacred Harp: the best collection of sacred songs, hymns, odes, and anthems ever offered the singing public for general use (1991 rev.) #562

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O may our humble spirits stand
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6 D
Source: V. 1: "How long shall death, the tyrant, reign?"; V. 2: "When the last trumpet's awful voice"
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
Text

The Sacred Harp #562

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.