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O most delightful hour by man

O most delightful hour by man

Author: William Cowper
Published in 8 hymnals

Author: William Cowper

Cowper, William, the poet. The leading events in the life of Cowper are: born in his father's rectory, Berkhampstead, Nov. 26, 1731; educated at Westminster; called to the Bar, 1754; madness, 1763; residence at Huntingdon, 1765; removal to Olney, 1768; to Weston, 1786; to East Dereham, 1795; death there, April 25, 1800. The simple life of Cowper, marked chiefly by its innocent recreations and tender friendships, was in reality a tragedy. His mother, whom he commemorated in the exquisite "Lines on her picture," a vivid delineation of his childhood, written in his 60th year, died when he was six years old. At his first school he was profoundly wretched, but happier at Westminster; excelling at cricket and football, and numbering Warren Hasti… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O most delightful hour by man
Author: William Cowper

Notes

O most delightful hour by man. W. Cowper. [Death and Burial.] These are the "Stanzas Subjoined to a Bill of Mortality for the Parish of All Saints, in the Town of Northampton, Anno Domini 1789," and subsequently published with Cowper's translations from the French of Madame Guion, as Poems Translated from the French of Madame de la Mothe Guion, &c, Newport-Pagnel, 1801, p. 122. There are 9 stanzas of 4 lines in all. Of these stanzas i.-iv. with alterations, were given in Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1840 and 1873, and also in a few American collections. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)
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Christian Hymns for Public and Private Worship #600

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Church Pastorals, hymns and tunes for public and social worship #884

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Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes; for the use of Christian Congregations #1125

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Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs #B192

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Songs for Social and Public Worship #479

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The Baptist Hymn and Tune Book #1125

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