Precious Bible, what a treasure

Precious Bible, what a treasure

Author: John Newton
Published in 136 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1.
Precious Bible, what a treasure,
Does the word of God afford!
All I want for life or pleasure,
Food or medicine, shield or sword.
Let the world account me poor,
Having this, I want no more.

2.
Food to which the world's a stranger,
Here my hungry soul enjoys;
Of excess there is no danger,
Though it fills, it never cloys.
On a dying Christ I feed,
He is meat and drink indeed.



Source: The Southern Harmony, and Musical Companion (New ed. thoroughly rev. and much enl.) #311

Author: John Newton

Newton, John, who was born in London, July 24, 1725, and died there Dec. 21, 1807, occupied an unique position among the founders of the Evangelical School, due as much to the romance of his young life and the striking history of his conversion, as to his force of character. His mother, a pious Dissenter, stored his childish mind with Scripture, but died when he was seven years old. At the age of eleven, after two years' schooling, during which he learned the rudiments of Latin, he went to sea with his father. His life at sea teems with wonderful escapes, vivid dreams, and sailor recklessness. He grew into an abandoned and godless sailor. The religious fits of his boyhood changed into settled infidelity, through the study of Shaftesbury and… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Precious Bible, what a treasure
Author: John Newton
Meter: 8.7.8.7.7.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Precious Bible! what a treasure. J. Newton. [Holy Scriptures.] Published in his Twenty Six Letters, &c. By Omicron, 1774, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, and headed, “The Word of God more precious than Gold." It was repeated in R. Conyers's Collection, 1774, No. 276, and again in the Olney Hymns, 1779, Book ii., No. 63. It is found in a few modern hymnbooks.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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