Redeemer of the nations, come, Redeem yourself in virgin birth

Translator: Charles P. Price, b. 1920

Price was born in Pittsburgh in 1920 and educated at Harvard University, Virgina Theological Seminary, and Union Theological Seminary in New York City. He studied piano with Elizabeth and Ferguson Webster and was ordained as a deacon and priest in the Episcopal Church, Diocese of Pittsburgh. He served churches in Pennsylvania and New York City before becoming a professor at Virginia Theological Seminary (1956-1963). From 1963 to 1972 he was preacher to the university and Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard University before returning to Virginia Seminary as professor of systematic theology (1972-1989). Price was a member of the Standing Liturgical Commission (1967-1985) and the Committee on Texts for The Hymnal 1982 (197… Go to person page >

Author (attributed to): Ambrose of Milan, 340-397

Ambrose (b. Treves, Germany, 340; d. Milan, Italy, 397), one of the great Latin church fathers, is remembered best for his preaching, his struggle against the Arian heresy, and his introduction of metrical and antiphonal singing into the Western church. Ambrose was trained in legal studies and distinguished himself in a civic career, becoming a consul in Northern Italy. When the bishop of Milan, an Arian, died in 374, the people demanded that Ambrose, who was not ordained or even baptized, become the bishop. He was promptly baptized and ordained, and he remained bishop of Milan until his death. Ambrose successfully resisted the Arian heresy and the attempts of the Roman emperors to dominate the church. His most famous convert and disciple w… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Redeemer of the nations, come, Redeem yourself in virgin birth
Translator: Charles P. Price, b. 1920
Author (attributed to): Ambrose of Milan, 340-397
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English
Publication Date: 1982
Copyright: © 1982, Charles P. Price

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Hymnal 1982 #55

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