Rise, rise, my soul, and leave the ground

Rise, rise, my soul, and leave the ground

Author: Isaac Watts
Tune: COBB
Published in 48 hymnals

Representative Text

Rise, rise, my soul, and leave the ground,
Stretch all thy thoughts abroad,
And rouse up every tuneful sound
To praise th' eternal God.

Long ere the lofty skies were spread,
Jehovah filled his throne;
Or Adam formed, or angels made,
The Maker lived alone.

His boundless years can ne'er decrease,
But still maintain their prime;
Eternity's his dwelling-place,
And ever is his time.

While like a tide our minutes flow,
The present and the past,
He fills his own immortal now,
And sees our ages waste.

The sea and sky must perish too,
And vast destruction come;
The creatures-look! how old they grow,
And wait their fiery doom!

Well, let the sea shrink all away,
And flame melt down the skies,
My God shall live an endless day,
When th' old creation dies.



Source: Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The #II.17

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Rise, rise, my soul, and leave the ground
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Sacred Harp #313b

Include 47 pre-1979 instances
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