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Servant of all, to toil for man

Full Text

1. Servant of all, to toil for man
Thou didst not, Lord, refuse;
Thy majesty did not disdain
To be employed for us.

2. Son of the carpenter, receive
This humble work of mine;
Worth to my meanest labor give,
By joining it to Thine.

3. End of my every action Thou,
In all things Thee I see;
Accept my hallowed labor now,
I do it unto Thee.

4. Thy bright example I pursue,
To Thee in all things rise;
And all I think or speak or do
Is one great sacrifice.

5. Careless through outward cares I go,
From all distraction free;
My hands are but engaged below,
My heart is still with Thee.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #6169

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Servant of all, to toil for man
Author: Charles Wesley

Tune

AZMON

Lowell Mason (PHH 96) adapted AZMON from a melody composed by Carl G. Gläser in 1828. Mason published a duple-meter version in his Modern Psalmist (1839) but changed it to triple meter in his later publications. Mason used (often obscure) biblical names for his tune titles; Azmon, a city south of C…

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ST. LEONARD (Smart)


ST. JAMES (Courteville)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #6169
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #383
The Cyber Hymnal #6169TextScoreAudio
Include 9 pre-1979 instances



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