Sing, my tongue, the Saviour's battle

Representative Text

1 Sing, my tongue, the glorious battle;
tell the triumph far and wide;
tell aloud the wondrous story
of the cross, the Crucified;
tell how Christ, the world's redeemer,
vanquished death the day he died.

2 God in mercy saw us fallen,
sunk in shame and misery,
felled to death in Eden's garden,
where in pride we claimed the tree;
then another tree was chosen,
which the world from death would free.

3 Tell how, when at length the fullness
of the appointed time was come,
Christ, the Word, was born of woman,
left for us the heavenly home,
blazed the path of true obedience,
shone as light amidst the gloom.

4 Thirty years among us dwelling,
Jesus went from Nazareth,
destined, dedicated, willing,
did his work and met his death;
like a lamb he humbly yielded
on the cross his dying breath.

5 Faithful cross, true sign of triumph,
be for all the noblest tree;
none in foliage, none in blossom,
none in fruit your equal be;
symbol of the world's redemption,
for your burden makes us free.


Source: Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #225

Translator: Edward Caswall

Edward Caswall was born in 1814, at Yately, in Hampshire, where his father was a clergyman. In 1832, he went to Brasenose College, Oxford, and in 1836, took a second-class in classics. His humorous work, "The Art of Pluck," was published in 1835; it is still selling at Oxford, having passed through many editions. In 1838, he was ordained Deacon, and in 1839, Priest. He became perpetural Curate of Stratford-sub-Castle in 1840. In 1841, he resigned his incumbency and visited Ireland. In 1847, he joined the Church of Rome. In 1850, he was admitted into the Congregation of the Oratory at Birmingham, where he has since remained. He has published several works in prose and poetry. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872… Go to person page >

Author: Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus

Venantius Honorius Clematianus Fortunatus (b. Cenada, near Treviso, Italy, c. 530; d. Poitiers, France, 609) was educated at Ravenna and Milan and was converted to the Christian faith at an early age. Legend has it that while a student at Ravenna he contracted a disease of the eye and became nearly blind. But he was miraculously healed after anointing his eyes with oil from a lamp burning before the altar of St. Martin of Tours. In gratitude Fortunatus made a pilgrimage to that saint's shrine in Tours and spent the rest of his life in Gaul (France), at first traveling and composing love songs. He developed a platonic affection for Queen Rhadegonda, joined her Abbey of St. Croix in Poitiers, and became its bishop in 599. His Hymns far all th… Go to person page >

Tune

PANGE LINGUA (Mode III)


FORTUNATUS NEW


REGENT SQUARE (Smart)

Henry T. Smart (PHH 233) composed REGENT SQUARE for the Horatius Bonar (PHH 260) doxology "Glory be to God the Father." The tune was first published in the English Presbyterian Church's Psalms and Hymns for Divine Worship (1867), of which Smart was music editor. Because the text editor of that hymna…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)
Page Scan

Breaking Bread (Vol. 39) #147

TextAudioPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Worship #355

Text

Evangelical Lutheran Worship #356

Text InfoTextAudio

Glory to God #225

TextPage Scan

Journeysongs (2nd ed.) #414

Text

Journeysongs (3rd ed.) #384

Oramos Cantando = We Pray In Song #722

Worship (4th ed.) #491

Include 33 pre-1979 instances
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