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Sing, My Tongue, the Song of Triumph

Representative Text

1 Sing, my tongue, the song of triumph,
Tell the story far and wide;
Tell of dread and final battle,
Sing of Savior crucified;
How upon the cross a victim
Vanquishing in death he died.

2 He endured the nails, the spitting,
Vinegar and spear and reed;
From that holy body broken
Blood and water forth proceed:
Earth and stars and sky and ocean
By that flood from stain are freed.

3 Faithful Cross, above all other,
One and only noble tree,
None in foliage, none in blossom,
None in fruit your peer may be;
Sweet and wood and sweet the iron
And your burden, sweet is he.

4 Bend your boughs, O Tree of glory!
All your rigid branches, bend!
For a while the ancient temper
That your birth bestowed, suspend;
And the King of earth and heaven
Gently on your bosom tend.

Source: Catholic Book of Worship III #69

Author: Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus

Venantius Honorius Clematianus Fortunatus (b. Cenada, near Treviso, Italy, c. 530; d. Poitiers, France, 609) was educated at Ravenna and Milan and was converted to the Christian faith at an early age. Legend has it that while a student at Ravenna he contracted a disease of the eye and became nearly blind. But he was miraculously healed after anointing his eyes with oil from a lamp burning before the altar of St. Martin of Tours. In gratitude Fortunatus made a pilgrimage to that saint's shrine in Tours and spent the rest of his life in Gaul (France), at first traveling and composing love songs. He developed a platonic affection for Queen Rhadegonda, joined her Abbey of St. Croix in Poitiers, and became its bishop in 599. His Hymns far all th… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Sing, my tongue, the song of triumph
Title: Sing, My Tongue, the Song of Triumph
Author: Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus
Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7
Source: Tr.: The Three Days, 1981
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)
Text

Catholic Book of Worship III #69

Hymnal #256

Page Scan

RitualSong (2nd ed.) #601

Page Scan

RitualSong #573

TextPage Scan

Worship (3rd ed.) #437

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