Sinner, art thou still secure?

Sinner, art thou still secure?

Author: John Newton
Published in 174 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Sinner, art thou still secure?
Wilt thou still refuse to pray?
Can thy heart or hands endure
In the Lord's avenging day!

2 See, his mighty arm is bared!
Awful terrors clothe his brow!
For his judgment stand prepared,
Thou must either break or bow.

3 At his presence nature shakes,
Earth affrighted hastes to flee;
Solid mountains melt like wax,
What will then become of thee?

4 Who his advent may abide?
You that glory in your shame,
Will you find a place to hide
When the world is wrapped in flame?

5 Then the rich, the great, the wise,
Trembling, guilty, self-condemned;
Must behold the wrathful eyes
Of the Judge they once blasphemed.

6 Where are now their haughty looks,
Oh, their horror and despair!
When they see the opened books,
And their dreadful sentence hear!

7 Lord, prepare us by thy grace!
Soon we must resign our breath;
And our souls be called to pass
Through the iron gate of death.

8 Let us now our day improve,
Listen to the gospel voice;
Seek the things that are above;
Scorn the world's pretended joys.

The Hartford Selection of Hymns from the most approved authors, 1799

Author: John Newton

John Newton (b. London, England, 1725; d. London, 1807) was born into a Christian home, but his godly mother died when he was seven, and he joined his father at sea when he was eleven. His licentious and tumul­tuous sailing life included a flogging for attempted desertion from the Royal Navy and captivity by a slave trader in West Africa. After his escape he himself became the captain of a slave ship. Several factors contributed to Newton's conversion: a near-drowning in 1748, the piety of his friend Mary Catlett, (whom he married in 1750), and his reading of Thomas à Kempis' Imitation of Christ. In 1754 he gave up the slave trade and, in association with William Wilberforce, eventually became an ardent abolitionist. After becoming a tide… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Sinner, art thou still secure?
Author: John Newton
Meter: 7.7.7.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #5892

The Sacred Harp #523

Include 172 pre-1979 instances
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