Sweet rivers of redeeming love

Sweet rivers of redeeming love

Author: John A. Granade
Tune: SWEET RIVERS
Published in 108 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Representative Text

1 Sweet rivers of redeeming love
I see before me lie;
Had I the pinions of a dove,
I'd to those rivers fly.

2 I'd rise superior to my pain,
With joy outstrip the wind;
I'd cross bold Jordan's stormy main,
And leave the world behind.

3 A few more days, or years at most,
My troubles will be o'er;
I hope to join the heavenly host
On Canaan's happy shore.

4 My rapturous soul shall drink and feast
In love's unbounded sea:
The glorious hope of endless rest
Is ravishing to me.

5 O, come, my Saviour, come away,
And bear me to the sky!
Nor let thy chariot wheels delay;
Make haste and bring it nigh.

6 I long to see thy glorious face,
And in thine image shine;
To triumph in victorious grace,
And be forever thine.

Source: The Seventh-Day Adventist Hymn and Tune Book: for use in divine worship #806

Author: John A. Granade

Born: 1770, New Bern County, North Carolina. Died: December 6, 1807, Sumner County, Tennessee. After a period of desperate depression, Granade came to Christ in 1800 at a Presbyterian camp meeting at Desha’s Creek, Sumner County, Tennessee. Ordained a Methodist circuit riding preacher, Granade was referred to by the Nashville Banner as the "wild man of Goose Creek" (Sumner County, Tennessee) and was also variously known as "the poet of the backwoods" and "the Wild Man of Holston." Granade worked in part in the world of shape-note singing in the Shenandoah Valley, where a variety of musical sources, both sacred and profane, were at play. His works include: Pilgrim’s Songster (Lexington, Kentucky: 1804) --www.hymntime.com/tc… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Sweet rivers of redeeming love
Author: John A. Granade
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

The Sacred Harp #61

The Sacred Harp #61

Include 106 pre-1979 instances
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