Praise for the Incarnation

Sweeter sounds than music knows

Author: John Newton
Published in 72 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Sweeter sounds than music knows
Charm me in Immanuel's name;
All her hopes my spirt owes
To his birth, and cross, and shame.

2 When he came, the angels sung,
"Glory be to God on high:"
Lord, unloose my stammering tongue;
Who should louder sing than I?

3 Did the Lord a man become,
That he might the law fulfill,
Bleed and suffer in my room,
And canst thou, my tongue, be still!

4 No; I must my praises bring,
Though they worthless are, and weak;
For should I refuse to sing,
Sure the very stones would speak.

5 O my Saviour! Shield and Sun,
Shepherd, Brother, Lord, and Friend
Every precious name in one!
I will love thee without end.

Source: Laudes Domini: a selection of spiritual songs, ancient and modern for use in the prayer-meeting #388

Author: John Newton

John Newton (b. London, England, 1725; d. London, 1807) was born into a Christian home, but his godly mother died when he was seven, and he joined his father at sea when he was eleven. His licentious and tumul­tuous sailing life included a flogging for attempted desertion from the Royal Navy and captivity by a slave trader in West Africa. After his escape he himself became the captain of a slave ship. Several factors contributed to Newton's conversion: a near-drowning in 1748, the piety of his friend Mary Catlett, (whom he married in 1750), and his reading of Thomas à Kempis' Imitation of Christ. In 1754 he gave up the slave trade and, in association with William Wilberforce, eventually became an ardent abolitionist. After becoming a tide… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Sweeter sounds than music knows
Title: Praise for the Incarnation
Author: John Newton
Meter: 7.7.7.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #6304

Include 71 pre-1979 instances
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