Rising of the Church, by Baptism

The rise of Zion doth appear

Author: Anna Beeman
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

1 The rise of Zion doth appear,
The seals are open'd to her mind,
The bride her ornament doth wear,
More then for many years behind.

2 Up from the wilderness she came,
Leaving tradition, will and pride,
And trusting in her Saviour's name
March'd glorious by her leader's side.

3 And as they march'd they talk'd of love,
No cross nor troubles doth appear,
She feels the comfort of the dove,
And thinks there's nothing she can fear.

4 But suddenly e're she's aware,
A watery fountain doth appear,
She sees her masters footsteps there,
Again she looks and sees more clear.

5 She stops and lifts her eyes above,
Cries can I follow Jesus here?
He looks at her with eyes of love,
Saith what is duty never fear.

6 The she's resolved with the view,
And is baptised like her Lord;
Then he restores the dove anew,
Shews her the treasures of his word.

7 These treasures much enrich the bride,
The good of this she soon doth find,
She still keeps near her Saviour's side,
Forgets the things that are behind.

8 Come all that trusts a Saviour's frame,
Take up your cross and follow him,
Come be baptised in his name,
To shew that you are dead to sin.



Source: Hymns on Various Subjects #15

Author: Anna Beeman

Anna Keeney Beeman born in Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut. She was the among the first female Baptist hymn writers in America. She believed strongly in baptism by immersion. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Children and Grandchildren of Thomas Beeman" (on RootsWeb, accessed 11/8/2020) and I Will Sing the Wondrous Story: a history of Baptist hymnody in North America by David W. Music and Paul Akers Richardson (Mercer University Press, Macon, GA: 2008) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The rise of Zion doth appear
Title: Rising of the Church, by Baptism
Author: Anna Beeman
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
Text

Hymns on Various Subjects #15

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