The three wonders

Representative Text

1 The wonder working Master
Once deigned His race to save,
When dry land for His people
He made the Red Sea wave;
Now born for us, all willing,
Of maiden pure and sweet,
The path to heavenly mansions
He opens to our feet.

2 The bush unburned most truly
Portrays the holy womb,
Whence sprung the Word incarnate
To loose the ancient doom,
And all the bitter sorrows
Of Eva’s curse to stay,
The Word, who hither wended
Our sin to do away.

3 To Him, with God the Father
In substance truly One,
One with mankind, from all men
Be laud for ever done:
God to our human nature,
To our mortality
In form conjoined, we worship,
And Him we glorify.

4 Thee, Word of God eternal,
Who wert before the sun,
The star showed to the Magi,
A poor and suffering One:
Thee, swaddled in a manger,
They saw with glad accord,
And hailed Thee with rejoicing,
True man, and yet the Lord.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #10678

Author: St. John of Damascus

Eighth-century Greek poet John of Damascus (b. Damascus, c. 675; d. St. Sabas, near Jerusalem, c. 754) is especially known for his writing of six canons for the major festivals of the church year. John's father, a Christian, was an important official at the court of the Muslim caliph in Damascus. After his father's death, John assumed that position and lived in wealth and honor. At about the age of forty, however, he became dissatisfied with his life, gave away his possessions, freed his slaves, and entered the monastery of St. Sabas in the desert near Jerusalem. One of the last of the Greek fathers, John became a great theologian in the Eastern church. He defended the church's use of icons, codified the practices of Byzantine chant, and wr… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The wonder working Master
Title: The three wonders
Author: St. John of Damascus

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #10678
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  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

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The Cyber Hymnal #10678

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