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Today We All Are Called to Be Disciples

Representative text cannot be shown for this hymn due to copyright.

Author: H. Kenn Carmichael

H. Kenn Carmichael was born in Martins Ferry, 1908 and graduated from Muskingum College (B.A. 1938), the University of Wisconsin (M.A. in Speech, 1930), and the University of Minnesota (Ph.D. in Theater, 1941). He was head of the theatre department at Purdue University (1931-1943). From 1943 to 1946, Carmichael served in the U.S. Navy, where he made training films. After his enlistment ended, Carmichael taught at City College, Los Angeles (1947-1954), and then joined Film Production International producing films for denominational stewardship campaigns. In 1962, Carmichael and his wife were commissioned by the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (COEMAR) of the United Presbyterian Church U.S.A. as consultants in communicat… Go to person page >

Tune

KINGSFOLD

Thought by some scholars to date back to the Middle Ages, KINGSFOLD is a folk tune set to a variety of texts in England and Ireland. The tune was published in English Country Songs [sic: English County Songs] (1893), an anthology compiled by Lucy E. Broadwood and J. A. Fuller Maitland. After having…

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NOEL (Sullivan)

The tune NOEL (also used at 185) is also known as EARDISLEY or GERARD. Arthur Seymour Sullivan (b Lambeth, London. England. 1842; d. Westminster, London, 1900) adapted this traditional English melody (probably one of the variants of the folk song "Dives and Lazarus"), added phrases of his own to rec…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)
Text InfoAudio

Glory to God #757

Moravian Book of Worship #696

The Presbyterian Hymnal #434

Voices United #507

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