Ungrateful sinners! whence this scorn

Ungrateful sinners! whence this scorn

Author: Philip Doddridge
Tune: CULROSS
Published in 16 hymnals

Representative Text

Ungrateful sinners! whence this scorn
Of God’s long-suff’ring grace?
And whence this madness that insults
th’ Almighty to his face?

Is it because his patience waits,
and pitying bowels move,
You multiply transgressions more,
and scorn his offered love?

141
Dost thou not know, self-blinded man!
his goodness is designed
To wake repentance in thy soul,
and melt thy hardened mind?

And wilt thou rather chuse to meet
th’ Almighty as thy foe,
And treasure up his wrath in store
against the day of woe?

Soon shall that fatal day approach
that must thy sentence seal,
And righteous judgments, now unknown,
in awful pomp reveal;

While they, who full of holy deeds
to glory seek to rise,
Continuing patient to the end,
shall gain th’ immortal prize.



Source: Scottish Psalter and Paraphrases #R45

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Ungrateful sinners! whence this scorn
Author: Philip Doddridge
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Irish Presbyterian Hymbook #T51c

Include 15 pre-1979 instances
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