During our last fund drive one donor said this: "I love hymns ... If you asked for money, it means you need it! Please keep the work going. And please, accept my widow's mite. God bless you."

She was right. We only ask for money twice a year, and we do so because we need it.

So, before you close this box and move on to use the many resources on Hymnary.org, please prayerfully consider whether you might be able to make a gift to support our work. Gifts of any amount are appreciated, assist our work and let us know that we have partners in our effort to create the best database of hymns on the planet.

To donate online via PayPal or credit card, use the Calvin University secure giving site (https://calvin.quadweb.site/giving/hymnary).

If you'd like to make a gift by check, please send it to: Hymnary.org, Calvin University, 3201 Burton Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

And to read more about big plans for Hymnary, see https://hymnary.org/blog/major-additions-planned-for-hymnary.

Wake, O Wake, and Sleep No Longer

Representative Text

To view this media, please accept the license agreement:

Hope Publishing: one copy

In order to use resources from the Hope Publishing Company, you must reside in the United States or Canada. Hope Publishing Company owns or administers the contents in these territories.
You may download one copy of this selection for your own personal use. To make any further copies or to perform the work you must get permission from Hope Publishing Company or belong to and report the copying activity to CCLI, LicenSing or OneLicense.net. By selecting "I Agree" you are verifying that you reside in the U.S. or Canada and will only legally use this selection.



Source: One in Faith #353

Author: Philipp Nicolai

Philipp Nicolai (b. Mengeringhausen, Waldeck, Germany, 1556; d. Hamburg, Germany, 1608) lived an eventful life–he fled from the Spanish army, sparred with Roman Catholic and Calvinist opponents, and ministered to plague-stricken congregations. Educated at Wittenberg University, he was ordained a Lutheran pastor in 1583 in the city of Herdecke. However, he was soon at odds with the Roman Catholic town council, and when Spanish troops arrived to reestablish Roman dominance, Nicolai fled. In 1588 he became chief pastor at Altwildungen and court preacher to Countess Argaretha of Waldeck. During that time Nicolai battled with Calvinists, who disagreed with him about the theology of the real presence of Christ in the Lord's Supper. These doctri… Go to person page >

Translator and Adapter: Christopher M. Idle

Christopher Martin Idle (b. Bromley, Kent, England, 1938) was educated at Elthan College, St. Peter's College, Oxford, and Clifton Theological College in Bristol, and was ordained in the Church of England. He served churches in Barrow-in-­Furness, Cumbria; London; and Oakley, Suffolk; and recently returned to London, where he is involved in various hymnal projects. A prolific author of articles on the Christian's public responsibilities, Idle has also published The Lion Book of Favorite Hymns (1980) and at least one hundred of his own hymns and biblical paraphrases. Some of his texts first appeared in hymnals published by the Jubilate Group, with which he is associated. He was also editor of Anglican Praise (1987). In 1998 Hope Publishing… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Wake, O wake, and sleep no longer
Title: Wake, O Wake, and Sleep No Longer
German Title: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme
Author: Philipp Nicolai
Translator and Adapter: Christopher M. Idle
Meter: 8.9.8.8.9.8.6.6.4.4.4.8
Language: English
Copyright: © 1982, Hope Publishing Co.

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 9 of 9)

Breaking Bread (Vol. 39) #54

TextPage Scan

Gather Comprehensive #335

Text

Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #199

Page Scan

Journeysongs (2nd ed.) #332

Page Scan

Journeysongs (3rd ed.) #298

TextPage Scan

One in Faith #353

Page Scan

RitualSong (2nd ed.) #512

Page Scan

RitualSong #489

Page Scan

Worship (3rd ed.) #371

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.