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Workman of God o lose not heart

Workman of God o lose not heart

Author: Frederick W. Faber
Published in 9 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1. Workman of God! O lose not heart,
But learn what God is like;
And in the darkest battlefield
Thou shalt know where to strike.

2. Thrice blest is he to whom is giv’n
The instinct that can tell
That God is on the field, when He
Is most invisible.

3. Blest too is he who can divine
Where real right doth lie,
And dares to take the side that seems
Wrong to man’s blindfold eye.

4. Then learn to scorn the praise of men,
And learn to lose with God;
For Jesus won the world through shame,
And beckons thee His road.

5. For right is right, since God is God,
And right the day must win;
To doubt would be disloyalty,
To falter would be sin.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #7622

Author: Frederick W. Faber

Raised in the Church of England, Frederick W. Faber (b. Calverly, Yorkshire, England, 1814; d. Kensington, London, England, 1863) came from a Huguenot and strict Calvinistic family background. He was educated at Balliol College, Oxford, and ordained in the Church of England in 1839. Influenced by the teaching of John Henry Newman, Faber followed Newman into the Roman Catholic Church in 1845 and served under Newman's supervision in the Oratory of St. Philip Neri. Because he believed that Roman Catholics should sing hymns like those written by John Newton, Charles Wesley, and William Cowpe, Faber wrote 150 hymns himself. One of his best known, "Faith of Our Fathers," originally had these words in its third stanza: "Faith of Our Fathers! Mary'… Go to person page >

Tune

BEDFORD (Wheal)


SOUTHPORT (Kingsley)


NATIVITY (Lahee)

Henry Lahee (b. Chelsea, London, England, 1826; d. Croydon, London, 1912) composed NATIVITY, which was first published in 1855 and set to a nativity hymn (thus the tune's title), "High let us swell our tuneful notes," by Philip Doddridge (PsH 335). Because NATIVITY was published with Isaac Watts' (P…

Go to tune page >


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #7622
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #7622

Include 8 pre-1979 instances
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