Worthy is he that once was slain

Worthy is he that once was slain

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 8 hymnals

Representative Text

1 Worthy is he, that once was slain,
The Prince of peace that groan'd and died;
Worthy to rise, and live, and reign,
At his almighty Father's side.

2 Pow'r and dominion are his due,
Who stood condemn'd at Pilate's bar.
Wisdom belongs to Jesus too,
Though he was charg'd with madness here.

3 Honour immortal must be paid,
Instead of scandal and of score;
While glory shines about his head,
And a bright crown without a thorn.

4 Blessings for ever on the Lamb,
Whose blood speaks peace to wretched men,
Let angels sound his sacred name;
And ev'ry creature say, Amen.

Source: Hymns, Selected and Original: for public and private worship (1st ed.) #134

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Worthy is he that once was slain
Author: Isaac Watts

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Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)
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Hymns, Selected and Original, for Public and Private Worship #134

TextPage Scan

Hymns, Selected and Original: for public and private worship (1st ed.) #134

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Hymns: selected and original, for public and private worship (30th ed.) #134

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Sacred Poetry #202

The Service of Song for Baptist Churches #d647

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