Years Are Coming

Representative Text

1 Years are coming, speed them onward
when the sword shall gather rust,
and the helmet, lance, and falchion
sleep at last in silent dust.
Earth has heard too long of battle,
heard the trumpet's voice too long.
But another age advances,
Seers foretold in ancient song.

2 Years are coming when forever
war's dread banner shall be furled,
and the angel Peace be welcomed,
regent of a happy world.
Hail with song that glorious era,
when the sword shall gather rust,
and the helmet, lance and falchion
sleep at last in silent dust.

Source: Singing the Living Tradition #166

Author: Adin Ballou

Ballou, Adin. (Cumberland, Rhode Island, April 23, 1803--August 5, 1890, Hopedale, Massachusetts). At the age of nineteen he was accepted as a minister in the Christian Connexion, but later entered the Universalist ministry and served churches in Milford, Mass.; New York City; and in Mendon and Hopedale, Mass. He is noted as founder of the famous Hopedale community (1842), an experiment in "practical Christianity." A hymn by him, beginning "Years are coming--speed them onward" was included in Church Harmonies, 1873, in Hymns of the Church, 1917, and in Hymns of the Spirit, 1937. --Henry Wilder Foote, DNAH Archives Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Years are coming, speed them onward
Title: Years Are Coming
Author: Adin Ballou
Meter: 8.8.7.8.5
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

HYFRYDOL

One of the most loved Welsh tunes, HYFRYDOL was composed by Rowland Hugh Prichard (b. Graienyn, near Bala, Merionetshire, Wales, 1811; d. Holywell, Flintshire, Wales, 1887) in 1830 when he was only nineteen. It was published with about forty of his other tunes in his children's hymnal Cyfaill y Cant…

Go to tune page >


ST. CLARE (Eyre)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #13255
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
Text

Singing the Living Tradition #166

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #13255

Include 6 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.