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909

Mayenziwe (Your Will Be Done)

Full Text

Your will be done on earth, O Lord.
Your will be done on earth, O Lord.
Your will be done on earth, O Lord.
Your will be done on earth, O Lord.
Your will be done on earth, O Lord.

Xhosa:
Mayenziwe ’ntando yakho.
Mayenziwe ’ntando yakho.
Mayenziwe ’ntando yakho.
Mayenziwe ’ntando yakho.
Mayenziwe ’ntando yakho.

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Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

This text is the first petition of the Lord’s Prayer. African Christians especially suffering the effects of famine, war, disease, and governmental corruption, cling fast to the eschatological hope that God’s will be done not only someday in heaven, but also now, on earth.

 

Sing!  A New Creation

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

God’s children are taught to think of the Lord’s Prayer as the model for prayer. Belgic Confession, Article 26 teaches us that “we call on the heavenly Father through Christ, our only Mediator, as we are taught by the Lords’ Prayer...” Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 45, Question and Answer 118 teaches that we should pray for “everything we need, spiritually and physically, as embraced in the prayer Christ our Lord himself taught us” and then spends seven Lord’s Days expounding on the petitions of the Lord’s Prayer. 

909

Mayenziwe (Your Will Be Done)

Additional Prayers

A Petitionary Prayer
 
O God, your kingdom come.
Your will be done on earth.
Your kingdom come.
Your will be done on earth, O Lord.
Your kingdom come.
Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
909

Mayenziwe (Your Will Be Done)

Hymn Story/Background

This South African tune comes to us by way of Scotland. George Mxadana taught it to John Bell of the Iona community in 1988. The particular origins of the music are unknown, though it belongs to Africa’s great body of undocumented four-part singing. First published in 1990, a North American edition of the work was included in Many and Great: Songs of the World Church, published by GIA Publications in 1992. A portion of the royalties to this song goes to the Council of Churches in South Africa.

Composer Information

John Bell (b. 1949) was born in the Scottish town of Kilmarnock in Ayrshire, intending to be a music teacher when he felt the call to the ministry. But in frustration with his classes, he did volunteer work in a deprived neighborhood in London for a time and also served for two years as an associate pastor at the English Reformed Church in Amsterdam. After graduating he worked for five years as a youth pastor for the Church of Scotland, serving a large region that included about 500 churches. He then took a similar position with the Iona Community, and with his colleague Graham Maule, began to broaden the youth ministry to focus on renewal of the church’s worship. His approach soon turned to composing songs within the identifiable traditions of hymnody that found began to address concerns missing from the current Scottish hymnal:
 
I discovered that seldom did our hymns represent the plight of poor people to God. There was nothing that dealt with unemployment, nothing that dealt with living in a multicultural society and feeling disenfranchised. There was nothing about child abuse…, that reflected concern for the developing world, nothing that helped see ourselves as brothers and sisters to those who are suffering from poverty or persecution. [from an interview in Reformed Worship (March 1993)]
 
That concern not only led to writing many songs, but increasingly to introducing them internationally in many conferences, while also gathering songs from around the world. He was convener for the fourth edition of the Church of Scotland’s Church Hymnary (2005), a very different collection from the previous 1973 edition. His books, The Singing Thing and The Singing Thing Too, as well as the many collections of songs and worship resources produced by John Bell—some together with other members of the Iona Community’s “Wild Goose Resource Group,” are available in North America from GIA Publications. 
— Emily Brink
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