We don't often ask for money. Just twice a year. This is one of those times. 

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In April 2020, according to Google Analytics, our Hymnary website had roughly 1.5 million sessions from approximately 1 million users. Both numbers were up 40% from April 2019. Amazing. And what a blessing! But it is expensive to serve all of these people -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people like you who love hymns.

And we have limited sources of revenue. This fund drive is one critical source. 

So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do. 

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by sending a check to Hymnary.org at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, or you can click the Donate button below. 

On behalf of the entire Hymnary.org team,
Harry Plantinga

John Goss

John Goss
Short Name: John Goss
Full Name: Goss, John, 1800-1880
Birth Year: 1800
Death Year: 1880

John Goss (b. Fareham, Hampshire, England, 1800; d. London, England, 1880). As a boy Goss was a chorister at the Chapel Royal and later sang in the opera chorus of the Covent Garden Theater. He was a professor of music at the Royal Academy of Music (1827-1874) and organist of St. Paul Cathedral, London (1838-1872); in both positions he exerted significant influence on the reform of British cathedral music. Goss published Parochial Psalmody (1826) and Chants, Ancient and Modern (1841); he edited William Mercer's Church Psalter and Hymn Book (1854). With James Turle he published a two-volume collection of anthems and Anglican service music (1854).

Bert Polman

Wikipedia Biography

Sir John Goss (27 December 1800 – 10 May 1880) was an English organist, composer and teacher. Born to a musical family, Goss was a boy chorister of the Chapel Royal, London, and later a pupil of Thomas Attwood, organist of St Paul's Cathedral. After a brief period as a chorus member in an opera company he was appointed organist of a chapel in south London, later moving to more prestigious organ posts at St Luke's Church, Chelsea and finally St Paul's Cathedral, where he struggled to improve musical standards.

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