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Tune Identifier:"^wave_bradbury$"

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WAVE

Meter: 8.7.8.4 Appears in 16 hymnals Composer and/or Arranger: William B. Bradbury Hymnal Title: The Hymnal Tune Key: B Flat Major Incipit: 11112 22331 76165 Used With Text: Star of peace to wanderers weary

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Star of peace to wanderers weary

Author: Mrs. Jane Bell Cross Simpson Appears in 156 hymnals Hymnal Title: Carmina Sanctorum, a selection of hymns and songs of praise with tunes Topics: For those at Sea Used With Tune: WAVE
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Book of grace, and book of glory!

Appears in 69 hymnals Hymnal Title: The New Sabbath School Hosanna Lyrics: 1 Book of grace, and book of glory! Gift of God to age and youth; Wondrous is thy sacred story,-- Bright, bright with truth. Wondrous is thy sacred story,-- Bright, bright with truth. 2 Book of love! in accents tender, Speaking unto such as we; May it lead us, Lord, to render All, all to thee. 3 Book of hope! the spirit sighing, Consolation finds in thee; As it hears the Saviour crying, "Come, come to me." 4 Book of peace! when nights of sorrow Fall upon us drearily. Thou wilt bring a shining morrow, Full, full of thee. 5 Book of life! when we, reposing, Bid farewell to friends we love, Give us, for the life then closing, Life, life above. Used With Tune: BOOK OF GRACE

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Star of peace to wanderers weary

Author: Mrs. Jane Bell Cross Simpson Hymnal: Carmina Sanctorum, a selection of hymns and songs of praise with tunes #666 (1886) Hymnal Title: Carmina Sanctorum, a selection of hymns and songs of praise with tunes Topics: For those at Sea Languages: English Tune Title: WAVE
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Star of peace to wanderers weary

Author: Mrs. Jane Bell Cross Simpson Hymnal: Carmina Sanctorum #666 (1885) Hymnal Title: Carmina Sanctorum Languages: English Tune Title: WAVE
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Star of peace to wanderers weary

Author: Jane C. Simpson Hymnal: Common Praise #683 (1913) Hymnal Title: Common Praise Languages: English Tune Title: WAVE

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Jane C. Simpson

1811 - 1886 Hymnal Title: The Hymnal Author of "Star of peace to wanderers weary" in The Hymnal Simpson, Jane Cross, née Bell, daughter of James Bell, Advocate, of Glasgow, was born Nov. 12, 1811. She contributed several pieces to The Edinburgh Literary Journal, of which her brother, Henry G. Bell, was editor, under the nom de plume of Gertrude; and later to the Scottish Christian Herald. She was married in 1837 to her cousin, Mr. J. B. Simpson, of Glasgow; and died June 17, 1886. Her publications are:—(1) The Piety of Daily Life, 1836; (2) April Hours, 1838; (3) Woman's History, 1848; (4) Linda, or Beauty and Genius, 1859; (5) Picture Poems, 1879; (6) Linda, and other Poems, 1879. Her hymns in common use are:— 1. Go when the morning shineth. Prayer. This appeared in The Edinburgh Literary Journal, Feb. 26, 1831, in 4 stanzas of 8 lines, and again in her April Hours, 1838, in 3 st. The full text from Mrs. Simpson's manuscript was given in Lyra Britannica, 1867, p. 507. It is extensively used. It is sometimes erroneously attributed to "Lord Morpeth;" and again to "Lord Carlisle." 2. I had a lesson to teach them. The Death of Children. Contributed to Dr. Rogers's Lyra Britannica, 1867, p. 508, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. It was repeated in full in Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873. 3. Star of morning, brightly shining. For use at Sea. Given in E. Prout's Psalmist, 1878. 4. Star of peace to wanderers weary. For those at Sea. Written in 1830, and given in the Scottish Evangelical Union Hymnal, 1878. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

William B. Bradbury

1816 - 1868 Hymnal Title: The Hymnal Arranger of "WAVE" in The Hymnal William Bachelder Bradbury USA 1816-1868. Born at York, ME, he was raised on his father's farm, with rainy days spent in a shoe-shop, the custom in those days. He loved music and spent spare hours practicing any music he could find. In 1830 the family moved to Boston, where he first saw and heard an organ and piano, and other instruments. He became an organist at 15. He attended Dr. Lowell Mason's singing classes, and later sang in the Bowdoin Street church choir. Dr. Mason became a good friend. He made $100/yr playing the organ, and was still in Dr. Mason's choir. Dr. Mason gave him a chance to teach singing in Machias, ME, which he accepted. He returned to Boston the following year to marry Adra Esther Fessenden in 1838, then relocated to Saint John, New Brunswick. Where his efforts were not much appreciated, so he returned to Boston. He was offered charge of music and organ at the First Baptist Church of Brooklyn. That led to similar work at the Baptist Tabernacle, New York City, where he also started a singing class. That started singing schools in various parts of the city, and eventually resulted in music festivals, held at the Broadway Tabernacle, a prominent city event. He conducted a 1000 children choir there, which resulted in music being taught as regular study in public schools of the city. He began writing music and publishing it. In 1847 he went with his wife to Europe to study with some of the music masters in London and also Germany. He attended Mendelssohn funeral while there. He went to Switzerland before returning to the states, and upon returning, commenced teaching, conducting conventions, composing, and editing music books. In 1851, with his brother, Edward, he began manufacturring Bradbury pianos, which became popular. Also, he had a small office in one of his warehouses in New York and often went there to spend time in private devotions. As a professor, he edited 59 books of sacred and secular music, much of which he wrote. He attended the Presbyterian church in Bloomfield, NJ, for many years later in life. He contracted tuberculosis the last two years of his life. John Perry

Thomas MacKellar

1812 - 1899 Hymnal Title: The Hymnal for Young People Author of "Book of grace, and book of glory" in The Hymnal for Young People Mackellar, Thomas, was born in New York, Aug. 12, 1812. At the age of 14 he entered the printing establishment of Harper Brothers. In 1833 he removed to Philadelphia and joined the type-foundry firm of Johnson & Smith, as proof reader. He subsequently became a foreman, and then a partner in that firm, which has been known from 1860 as Mackellar, Smiths, and Jordan, type-founders of Philadelphia. His publications include The American Printer, 1866, a prose work, and the following in verse:— (1) Droppings from the Heart, 1844; (2) Tam's Fortnight Ramble, 1847; (3) Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; (4) Rhymes Atween Times, 1872. The last contains some of his hymns. (5) Hymns and a few Metrical Psalms, Phila. 1883 (71 hymns, 3 psalms), 2nd edition, 1887 (84 hymns, 3 psalms). Those of his hymns in common use include :— 1. At the door of mercy sighing. Lent. Published in his Rhymes Atween Times, 1872, as, "Long of restful peace forsaken," and again in Dr. Hitchcock's Hymns & Songs of Praise, 1874, as "At the door of mercy sighing." 2. Bear the burden of the present. Resignation. Written in 1852, and published in his Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; and Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868. Part of this hymn, beginning "All unseen the Master walketh," was in common use in Great Britain. 3. Book of grace, and book of glory. Holy Scripture. Written in 1843. It was given in the Sunday School Union Collection, 1860, and his Hymns and a few M. Psalms, &c, 1883, and a few collections, including Allon's Children's Worship, 1878, &c. 4. Draw nigh to the Holy. Jesus, the soul’s Refuge. In Sumner's Songs of Zion, 1851, and the Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 5 st. of 8 1ines. 5. Father, in my life's young morning. A Child's Prayer. Written in 1841. 6. In the vineyard of our Father. Work for God. Written in 1845. It was given in the Hymns for Church & Home, Philadelphia, I860, and other collections. 7. Jesus! when my soul is parting. Continued presence of Jesus desired. Written in 1848, and included in Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines, and entitled "Jesus first and last." 8. There is a land immortal. Heaven. Mr. Mackellar says that this hymn was written "One evening as a fancy suddenly struck me of a religious nature, I laid aside the work in hand, and pursuing the new idea, I at once produced the hymn, ‘There is a land immortal,' and sent it to the editor [of Neale's Gazette], who referred to it as a religious poem from ‘Tam,' my assumed name, under which I had already acquired considerable notoriety. This was in 1845. It was widely copied, and afterwards inserted in a volume published by me." Duffield's English Hymns, &c, 1886, p. 551. Mr. Mackellar was an Elder of the Presbyterian Church. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ====================== Mackellar, T., p. 708, ii. Additional hymns are:— (1) "I have no hiding-place" (Safety in Jesus), (2) “I will extol Thee every day" (Praise to God). These are dated 1880 and 1871 respectively in Stryker's Church Songs, N. Y., 1889. He died Dec. 29, 1899. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============ Mackellar, T., pp. 708, ii.; 1578, ii. He died Dec. 29, 1899. His hymn, “O the darkness, O the sorrow" (Redemption through Christ), was written in 1886, and added to the latest 1668 editions of his Hymns & Metrical Psalms. It is found in Summa Corda, 1898, and several other collections. His Hymns and Poems were collected and published in 1900. [Rev. L. F. Benson, D.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)