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Alas, My Aching Heart

Representative Text

1 Alas, my aching heart!
Here the keen torment lies;
It racks my waking hours with smart,
And frights my slumbering eyes.

2 Guilt will be hid no more,
My griefs take vent apace,
The crimes that blot my conscience o’er
Flush crimson in my face.

3 My sorrows like a flood
Impatient of restraint
Into Thy bosom, O my God,
Pour out a long complaint.

4 This impious heart of mine
Could once defy the Lord,
Could rush with violence on to sin
In presence of Thy sword.

5 As often have I stood
A rebel to the skies,
The calls, the tenders of a God,
And mercy’s loudest cries.

6 He offers all His grace,
And all His heaven to me;
Offers! But ’tis to senseless brass
That can nor feel nor see.

7 Jesus the Savior stands
To court me from above,
And looks and spreads His wounded hands,
And shows the prints of love.

8 But I, a stupid fool,
How long have I withstood
The blessings purchased with His soul,
And paid for all in blood?

9 The heav’nly Dove came down
And tendered me His wings,
To mount me upward to a crown
And bright immortal things.

10 Lord, I’m ashamed to say
That I refused Thy Dove,
And sent Thy Spirit grieved away
To His own realms of love.

11 Nor all Thine heav’nly charms,
Nor Thy revenging hand
Could force me to lay down my arms,
And bow to Thy command.

12 Lord, ’tis against Thy face
My sins like arrows rise,
And yet, and yet, O matchless grace
Thy thunder silent lies.

13 O shall I never feel
The meltings of Thy love?
Am I of such hell-hardened steel
That mercy cannot move?

14 Now for one powerful glance
Dear Savior, from Thy face!
This rebel heart no more withstands,
But sinks beneath Thy grace.

15 O’ercome by dying love I fall,
And at Thy cross I lie;
I throw my flesh, my soul, my all,
And weep, and love, and die.

16 Rise, says the Prince of mercy, rise;
With joy and pity in His eyes:
“Rise and behold My wounded veins;
Here flows the blood to wash thy stains.

17 See, My great Father’s reconciled:
He said, and lo, the Father smiled;
The joyful cherubs clapped their wings,
And sounded grace on all their strings.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #7921

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Alas, my aching heart!
Title: Alas, My Aching Heart
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Source: Horae Lyricae, 1706-09, Book 1
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

BANGOR (Tansur)

Traditionally used for Montgomery's text and for Peter Abelard's "Alone Thou Goest Forth, O Lord," BANGOR comes from William Tans'ur's A Compleat Melody: or the Harmony of Syon (the preface of which is dated 1734). In that collection the tune was a three-part setting for Psalm 12 (and for Psalm 11 i…

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Media

The Cyber Hymnal #7921
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

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The Cyber Hymnal #7921

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