Believe me, if all those endearing young charms

Believe me, if all those endearing young charms

Author: Thomas Moore
Tune: [Believe me, if all those endearing young charms]
Published in 2 hymnals

Representative Text

1 Believe me, if all those endearing young charms,
Which I gaze on so fondly today,
Were to change by tomorrow and fleet in my arms,
Like fairy gifts, fading away,
Thou would'st still be adored as this moment thou art,
Let the loveliness fade as it will;
And around the dear ruin, each wish of my heart
Would entwine itself verdantly still!

2 It is not while beauty and youth are thine own,
And thy cheeks unprofaned by a tear,
That the fervour and faith a soul can be known,
To which time will but make thee more dear!
No, the heart that has truly loved never forgets,
But as truly loves on to the close;
As the sunflower turns on her god, when he sets,
The same look which she turned when he rose.

Source: Songs of Service. Rev. ed. #a119

Author: Thomas Moore

Moore, Thomas, son of John Moore, a small tradesman at Dublin, was born in that city, May 28, 1779, educated at a private school and Trinity College, Dublin; read at the Middle Temple for the Bar; held a post under the Government in Bermuda for a short time, and died Feb. 26, 1852. His Memoirs, Journal, and Correspondence were published by Lord John Russell in 1855. In that work every detail concerning himself and his numerous publications, most of them of high poetical merit, will be found. His connection with hymnody is confined to his Sacred Songs, which were published in 1816, and again in his Collected Works, 1866. These Songs were 32 in all, and were written to popular airs of various nations. Of these Songs the following have passed… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Believe me, if all those endearing young charms
Author: Thomas Moore

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Songs of Service. Rev. ed. #a119

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Songs of Service #119

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