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Give to the Lord, as he has blessed thee

Author: James Boeringer

Boeringer, James. (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1930- ). He was educated at the College of Wooster (B.A., 1952), Columbia University (M.A., 1954), and Union Theological Seminary (D.S.M., 1964). He taught at the University of South Dakota (1959-1962), Oklahoma Baptist University (1962-1964), and Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. A composer of choral and instrumental music, and an author of articles and reviews in music journals. --William J. Reynolds, DNAH Archives… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Give to the Lord, as he has blessed thee
Author: James Boeringer
Meter: 9.8.9.8.8.8
Publication Date: 1961
Copyright: Copyright 1961 by the Hymn Society of America

Tune

GORE


NEUMARK

Published in 1657 (see above) WER NUR DEN LIEBEN GOTT is also known as NEUMARK. Johann S. Bach (PHH 7) used the tune in its isorhythmic shape (all equal rhythms) in his cantatas 21, 27, 84, 88, 93, 166, 179, and 197. Many Lutheran composers have also written organ preludes on this tune. WER NUR DEN…

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O DASS ICH TAUSEND ZUNGEN HÄTTE

Johann Balthaser König (b. Waltershausen, near Gotha, Germany, 1691; d. Frankfurt, Germany, 1758) composed this tune, which later became associated with Johann Mentzer's hymn "O dass ich tausend Zungen hätte" (Oh, That I Had a Thousand Voices). The harmonization is from the Wurttembergische Choral…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)

Baptist Hymnal 1975 #d98

Contemporary Hymn Tunes #7

Hymn Society of America [Hymns Published for Special Occasions, and on Special Subjects] 1942-79 #d52

Tune InfoPage Scan

Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church #408

Ten New Stewardship Hymns #1

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