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Glory to Thee, O Lord

Glory to Thee, O Lord, Who, from this world of sin

Author: Emma Leslie Toke
Published in 30 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Glory to Thee, O Lord,
Who, from this world of sin,
By cruel Herod's ruthless sword
Those precious ones didst win.

2 Glory to Thee for all
The ransom'd infant band,
Who since that hour have heard Thy call,
And reached the quiet land.

3 O that our hearts within,
Like theirs, were pure and bright;
O that, as free from deeds of sin
We shrank not from Thy sight.

4 Lord, help us every hour
Thy cleansing grace to claim;
In life to glorify Thy power,
In death to praise Thy Name.

Hymnal: according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, 1871

Author: Emma Leslie Toke

Mrs. Toke is the wife of the Rev. Nicholas Toke, Rector of Godington, Ashford, Kent. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Glory to Thee, O Lord, Who, from this world of sin
Title: Glory to Thee, O Lord
Author: Emma Leslie Toke
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Glory to Thee! O Lord, Who from this world of sin. Emma Toke. [Holy Innocents.] Written in 1851, and contributed anonymously to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Hymns for Public Worship, 1852, No. 119, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. Its use in Great Britain is extensive, but in America somewhat limited. Usually the text is given in full and unaltered. Hymns Ancient & Modern is an exception in favour of 5 stanzas, and the American Protestant Episcopal Church Hymnal, 1872, of 4 stanzas. A doxology is sometimes added, as in the Salisbury Hymn Book, 1857; Chope's Hymnal, 1864. An altered version beginning, "All praise to Thee, O Lord," was given in the Hymnary, 1870-2, but it has failed to gain any position. A second altered form as, "We give Thee praise, O Lord," appeared in T. Darling's Hymns, various editions, but this also is a failure.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #2067
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
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The Cyber Hymnal #2067

Include 29 pre-1979 instances
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