We don't often ask for money. Just twice a year. This is one of those times. 

So, please, before you hit the "close" button on this box, would you consider a donation to keep Hymnary.org going? 

In April 2020, according to Google Analytics, our Hymnary website had roughly 1.5 million sessions from approximately 1 million users. Both numbers were up 40% from April 2019. Amazing. And what a blessing! But it is expensive to serve all of these people -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people like you who love hymns.

And we have limited sources of revenue. This fund drive is one critical source. 

So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do. 

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by sending a check to Hymnary.org at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, or you can click the Donate button below. 

On behalf of the entire Hymnary.org team,
Harry Plantinga

God liveth ever!

Representative Text

1 GOD liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
God is good; from His compassion
Earthly help and comfort flow;
Strong is His right hand to fashion
All things well for man below:
Trial, oft the most distressing,
In the end has proved a blessing.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

2 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
He who gave the eye its vision,
Shall He slumber once or sleep?
He who gave the ear its mission,
Hears He not His children weep?
God is God; His ear attendeth
When the sigh our bosom rendeth.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

3 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
He who gives the clouds their measure,
Stretching out the heavens alone;
He who stores the earth with treasure,
Is not far from every one.
God in the hour of need defendeth
Him whose heart in love ascendeth.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

4 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
Is thy cross too great and pond'rous,
Cast on Him thy grievous load;
God is great, His love is wondrous,
He will speed thee on the road.
For His truth endureth ever,
And His mercy ceaseth never.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

5 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
Is the yoke of sin too galling?
Christ Himself has set thee free,
Borne for thee their weight appalling,
Cast them in oblivion's sea!
In thy deepest grief and sadness
He can grant thee joy and gladness.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

6 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
When the world would let thee perish,
Pathless all thy tangled way,
God the nearer draws, to cherish
Him who makes the Lord his stay.
Children oft that most He loveth
Thus with strictest rod He proveth.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

7 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
Heaven's huge vault may cleave asunder,
Earth's round globe in ruins burst,
Satan's fellest rage may thunder,
Death and hell may spend their worst;
Then will God keep safe and surely
Those who trust in Him securely.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.

8 God liveth still!
Soul, despair not, fear no ill!
Be thy life, until its ending,
Full of thorns, of grief or need,
God, in love the trial sending,
Thus His child would heavenwards lead.
For this life's long night of sadness
He will give thee peace and gladness.
Wherefore, then, my soul, despair?
God still lives, who heareth prayer.



Source: Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #513

Author: Johann Friedrich Zihn

Zihn, Johann Friedrich, was born Sept. 7, 1650, at Suhl, in Thuringia. After studying for some time at the University of Leipzig, he went to Wittenberg, where he graduated M.A. in 1675; and in 1679 was appointed rector of the school at Suhl. In 1690 he became diaconus, and in 1708 archidiaconus at Suhl, and died there, Jan. 16, 1719 (Wetzel, iii. 470; Koch, v. 419, &c). Zihn contributed five hymns (Nos. 526-530) to the Schleusingen Gesang-Buch, 1688, the title of which begins, Der himmlischer Freude zeitlicher Vorschmack. One has been translated, viz.:— Gott lebet noch, Seele was verzagst du doch. Cross and Consolation. 1688 as above, No. 529, in 8 stanzas of 10 lines, marked as by M. J. F. Z. In each stanza 11. 1, 2 are as quoted abo… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used i… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: God liveth ever!
German Title: Gott lebet noch
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1855)
Author: Johann Friedrich Zihn (1682)
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 12 of 12)

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn Book with Tunes #d114

TextPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #343

TextPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #513

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnbook (Lutheran Conference of Missouri and Other States) #d91

Page Scan

Hymnal for Evangelical Lutheran Missions #171

Page Scan

Hymns for the Church on Earth #260

Hymns of the Ages #d35

Page Scan

Hymns of the Church Militant #528

Page Scan

Lyra Germanica #33

Text

Lyra Germanica #14

The Selah Song Book (Das Sela Gesangbuch) #d194

The Selah Song Book. Word ed. #d100

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.