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Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah; all you peoples praise proclaim

Tune: IN BABILONE
Published in 2 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Hallelujah, hallelujah;
all you peoples, praise proclaim.
For God's grace and loving-kindness
O sing praises to his name.
For the greatness of God's mercy
constant praise to him accord.
For God's faithfulness eternal,
hallelujah, praise the LORD!

Source: Psalms for All Seasons: a complete Psalter for worship #117E

Text Information

First Line: Hallelujah, Hallelujah; all you peoples praise proclaim
Title: Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Meter: 8.7.8.7 D
Source: Psalter, 1887, alt.
Language: English

Notes

A call to all nations to praise the LORD. The seventh of eight "hallelujah" psalms (111-118), 117 is an expanded "Praise the LORD." It was probably composed for use at the beginning or end of temple liturgies. It stands fifth in the "Egyptian Hallel" used in Jewish liturgy at the annual religious festivals prescribed in the Torah. At Passover, Psalms 113 and 114 were sung before the meal; 115 through 118 were sung after the meal. Psalm 117 is only one stanza in length, but in calling all nations to praise the LORD for being faithful to Israel, it powerfully anticipates the Great Commission (Matt. 28:18-20). Paul quotes verse 1 in Romans 15:11 as proof that the salvation of Gentiles was not a divine afterthought. The versification derives from The Book of Psalms (1871), a text-only psalter that was later published with music in the 1887 Psalter. Liturgica1 Use: As an expanded "hallelujah," Psalm 117 has many uses in worship–by itself or possibly as a frame for another hymn. --Psalter Hymnal Handbook, 1987

Tune

IN BABILONE

IN BABILONE is a traditional Dutch melody that appeared in Oude en Nieuwe Hollantse Boerenlities en Contradansen (Old and New Dutch Peasant Songs and Country Dances), c. 1710. Ralph Vaughan Williams (PHH 316) discovered this tune as arranged by Julius Rontgen (b. Leipzig, Germany, 1855; d. Utrecht,…

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Timeline

Media

Psalter Hymnal (Gray) #117
  • Bulletin Score (melody only) (PDF)
  • Full Score (PDF, XML)
  • Bulletin Score (PDF)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextPage Scan

Psalms for All Seasons #117E

Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreAudioPage Scan

Psalter Hymnal (Gray) #117

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