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Heal Us, Emmanuel, Hear Our Prayer

Heal us, Emmanuel, hear our prayer

Author: William Cowper (1779)
Published in 11 hymnals

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Representative Text

1. Heal us, Emmanuel, hear our prayer;
we wait to feel thy touch;
deep-wounded souls to thee repair,
and Savior, we are such.

2. Our faith is feeble, we confess
we faintly trust thy word;
but wilt thou pity us the less?
Be that far from thee, Lord!

3. Remember him who once applied
with trembling for relief;
"Lord, I believe," with tears he cried;
"O help my unbelief!"

4. She, too, who touched thee in the press
and healing virtue stole,
was answered, "Daughter, go in peace:
thy faith hath made thee whole."

5. Like her, with hopes and fears we come
to touch thee if we may;
O send us not despairing home;
send none unhealed away.

Author: William Cowper

William Cowper (pronounced "Cooper"; b. Berkampstead, Hertfordshire, England, 1731; d. East Dereham, Norfolk, England, 1800) is regarded as one of the best early Romantic poets. To biographers he is also known as "mad Cowper." His literary talents produced some of the finest English hymn texts, but his chronic depression accounts for the somber tone of many of those texts. Educated to become an attorney, Cowper was called to the bar in 1754 but never practiced law. In 1763 he had the opportunity to become a clerk for the House of Lords, but the dread of the required public examination triggered his tendency to depression, and he attempted suicide. His subsequent hospitalization and friendship with Morley and Mary Unwin provided emotional st… Go to person page >

Notes

Heal us, Emmanuel, here we are. W. Cowper. [Lent.] First published in the Olney Hymns, 1779, Book i., No. 14, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and headed, "Jehovah Rophi, — I am the Lord that healeth thee." It is often found in the older collections in its original form, and it still retains its place in a few modern hymnals. Taken in its original, and the following altered forms of the text, its use is somewhat extensive:— 1. Heal us, Emmanuel! hear our prayer. This was given in the Salisbury Hymn Book, 1857, and was repeated in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871, and others. 2. Heal us, Emmanuel, here we stand. In the American Tract Society's Songs of Zion, 1864, &c. 3. Heal us, Immanuel, we are here. In the New Congregational Hymn Book 1859, and others. 4. Divine Physician of the Soul. In Kennedy, 1863. 5. Healer Divine, 0 hear our prayer. In a few American hymnals, including the Episcopal Hymns for Church & Home. Philadelphia, 1860. The references in this hymn to the father of the deaf and dumb child (St. Mark ix. 24), and to the woman healed of the issue of blood (St. Mark v. 34), render it most appropriate for use when those portions of Holy Scriptures are read in public worship, e.g. March 2, and 9. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

GRÄFENBERG

Composed by Johann Crüger (PHH 42) as a setting for Paul Gerhardt's "Nun danket all’ und bringet Ehr," GRÄFENBERG was first published in the 1647 edition of Crüger's Praxis Pietatis Melica. The tune is arbitrarily named after a water-cure spa in Silesia, Austria, which became famous in the 1820…

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KENWYN (Hopkins)


BEATITUDO

Composed by John B. Dykes (PHH 147), BEATITUDO was published in the revised edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern (1875), where it was set to Isaac Watts' "How Bright Those Glorious Spirits Shine." Originally a word coined by Cicero, BEATITUDO means "the condition of blessedness." Like many of Dykes's…

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The Cyber Hymnal #2229
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Instances

Instances (1 - 7 of 7)

Hymns and Psalms #390

TextPage Scan

Rejoice in the Lord #255

Singing the Faith #650

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #2229

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The United Methodist Hymnal #266

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The Worshiping Church #411

찬송과 예배 = Chansong gwa yebae = Come, Let Us Worship #328

Include 4 pre-1979 instances
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