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My Flesh is Meat Indeed

Here at thy table, Lord, we meet

Author: Samuel Stennett
Published in 147 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Here at Thy table, Lord, we meet,
To feed on food divine;
Thy body is the bread we eat,
Thy precious blood, the wine.

2 He that prepares this rich repast,
Himself comes down and dies;
And then invites us thus to feast,
Upon the sacrifice.

3 O was there ever love so free,
Dear Saviour, so divine!
Well Thou may'st claim that heart of me
Which owes so much to Thine.

4 Yea, surely Thou shalt have my heart,
My soul, my strength, my all;
With life itself I'll freely part,
My Jesus, at Thy call.

Amen.


Source: The Hymnal and Order of Service #242

Author: Samuel Stennett

Samuel Stennett was born at Exeter, in 1727. His father was pastor of a Baptist congregation in that city; afterwards of the Baptist Chapel, Little Wild Street, London. In this latter pastorate the son succeeded the father in 1758. He died in 1795. Dr. Stennett was the author of several doctrinal works, and a few hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Here at thy table, Lord, we meet
Title: My Flesh is Meat Indeed
Author: Samuel Stennett
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

DUNDEE (Ravenscroft)

DUNDEE first appeared in the 1615 edition of the Scottish Psalter published in Edinburgh by Andro Hart. Called a "French" tune (thus it also goes by the name of FRENCH), DUNDEE was one of that hymnal's twelve "common tunes"; that is, it was not associated with a specific psalm. In the Psalter Hymnal…

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COMMUNION (Fry)


MARTYRDOM (Wilson)

MARTYRDOM was originally an eighteenth-century Scottish folk melody used for the ballad "Helen of Kirkconnel." Hugh Wilson (b. Fenwick, Ayrshire, Scotland, c. 1766; d. Duntocher, Scotland, 1824) adapted MARTYRDOM into a hymn tune in duple meter around 1800. A triple-meter version of the tune was fir…

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Timeline




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