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In hymns of praise will I employ my tongue

In hymns of praise will I employ my tongue

Author: Thomas Cradock
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

1 In hymns of praise will I employ my tongue;
My tuneful harp shall answer to the song.
To thee, O Lord; for, when with pain distrest,
And foes around their cruel joy exprest,
Me in the evil day didst thou sustain,
My foes indulg'd their impious hopes in vain.
2 Struck with die dire disease, to thee I cried;
Nor was, O God, thy healing hand denied;
3 For from the dreary horrors of the grave,
When he implor'd, didst thou thy servant save,
His soul, just hov'ring o'er the pit retrieve,
And gav'st again, in joyous health to live.
4 O all ye saints, his gracious goodness sing;
Display his praises on the trembling firing;
5 For but a moment his dread anger lives,
While life, his quick-returning favour gives;
And, tho' the night in sighs, in tears, you spend,
The dawning morn will all your sorrows end.
6 Surpriz'd with my success, elate with pride,
Big with my empty self, I fondly cried;
"Strong in my happiness, my foes I dare,
"Nor open force, nor secret fraud, I fear."
7 By heav'n supported, like a mountain firm,
That braves the thunder, and disdains the storm,
Did I the angry bolts of fate deride,
And wrapt my heart in arrogance and pride;
But soon the folly of my ways I found,
Lost thy support, and felt a killing wound.
8 'Twas then my reason to my soul return'd;
In deep repentance I my madness mourn'd;
For thy forgiveness humbly sued, O Lord,
My guilt acknowledg'd, and thy aid implor'd.
9 "What profit is there (said I) in my blood?
"Justly thy vengeance has my crimes pursued.
"But can the dead thy wondrous works proclaim?
"Can dull, can ashes, celebrate thy name?
10 "O hear me, hear me, and thy mercy shew;
"Redeem my soul from death, my life from woe,"
11 Nor vainly did I pray; thy mercy heard;
My fainting soul in all her sorrows chear'd,
My grief to joy, my tears to laughter turn'd;
No more I languish'd, and no more I mourn'd.
12 Therefore thy goodness will I constant sing,
And to thy glorious name attune the string;
Therefore in hymns harmonious I'll display
Thy clemency; thy love, from day to day.

Source: New Version of the Psalms of David #XXX

Author: Thomas Cradock

Rector of St. Thomas's, Baltimore County, Maryland Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: In hymns of praise will I employ my tongue
Author: Thomas Cradock
Language: English
Publication Date: 1756
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.



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