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A Song of Christian Consolation and Joy

Is God for me? t'oppose me

Author: Paul Gerhardt; Translator: J. Kelly (1867)
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

Is God for me? t’oppose me
A thousand may uprise;
When I to pray’r arouse me,
He’ll chase mine enemies.
And doth the Head befriend me,
Am I belov’d by God?
Let foes then rise to rend me,
The wild opposing brood!

I know—from faith none moves me,
I boast—nor feel I shame,
That God as father loves me,
In Him, a friend I claim.
Whene’er the tempest rageth,
At my right hand is He,
Its violence assuageth,
And peace restores to me.

My faith securely buildeth
On Jesus, and His blood;
This, and this only, yieldeth
The true eternal good.
The life that my soul liveth,
Finds nothing on the earth;
What Christ the Saviour giveth
Of all our love is worth.

My Jesus is my Glory,
My Splendour, and clear Light,
Liv’d He not in and for me,
Before God’s eye so bright,
And ’fore His pure throne never
Could I a moment stay,
Must quickly flee for ever,
As wax ’fore fire away.

My Jesus death subdueth,
My sin remitteth quite,
He washeth aad reneweth,
The crimson maketh white.
I joy in Him, can ever
A hero’s courage feel,
And judgment fear dare never,
As though uncleansèd still.

Nought, nought, can e’er condemn me,
My courage take away;
Hell’s flames can ne’er o’erwhelm me,
For me they’re quench’d for aye.
No sentence e’er can move me,
No evil e’er deject,
My Saviour who doth love me,
Doth with His wings protect.

His Spirit in me dwelleth,
And ruleth every pow’r,
All pain and sorrow stilleth,
Dispels all clouds that low’r.
What He in me implanteth,
He blesseth every hour,
Help to say “Father” granteth,
With every ransom’d pow’r.

When heart with terror breaketh,
And weak and worn I feel,
Words whispers He and speaketh
That are unspeakable;
My mouth can frame them never,
To God they are well known,
Who what delights Him ever
Discovers in His own.

His Spirit mine relieveth
With words of comfort blest,
Shows how God succour giveth
To all who seek His rest;
And how a new and golden
Fair city rear’d hath He,
Which here from sight withholden,
My joyful eyes shall see.

My mansion’s there so splendid,
Prepar’d in yonder land;
Though when my course is ended,
I fall—Heav’n still doth stand.
Though care here often saddens
And causeth tears to flow,
My Jesu’s light oft gladdens
And sweetens every woe.

Whoe’er to Jesus bindeth
Himself, doth Satan hate,
He’s troubled much and findeth
His burden sore and great;
To suffer scarce is able,
Disgrace and scorn he meets,
The cross and every trouble
As daily bread he eats.

My mind this clear perceiveth,
Yet am I undismay’d;
To Thee my heart aye cleaveth,
On Thee shall cares be laid.
Though life and limb it cost me
And everything I have,
Unshaken shall I trust Thee,
Thee never shall I leave.

The world may ruin shiver,
Thou liv’st eternally,
Nor sword nor flame shall ever
Divide ’twixt Thee and me.
No thirst nor gnawing hunger,
No pain nor poverty,
Nor mighty prince’s anger
Shall ever hinder me.

No angel, nought that gladdens,
No throne nor majesty,
No love nor aught that saddens,
No grief nor misery,
Nor aught that man discovers,
Be it small or great,
From Thee, my heav’nly Lover’s
Embrace can separate.

My heart with joy is springing,
And sad I cannot be,
’Tis full of joy and singing,
The sunshine doth it see.
The Sun that looks with pleasure
On me is Christ my King;
The glory beyond measure
That waits me, makes me sing.

Paul Gerhardt’s Spiritual Songs, 1867

Author: Paul Gerhardt

Gerhardt, Paulus, son of Christian Gerhardt, burgomaster of Gräfenhaynichen, near Wittenberg, was born at Grafenhaynichen, Mar. 12, 1607. On January 2, 1628, he matriculated at the University of Wittenberg. In the registers of St. Mary's church, Wittenberg, his name appears as a godfather, on July 13, 1641, described still as "studiosus," and he seems to have remained in Wittenberg till at least the end of April, 1642. He appears to have gone to Berlin in 1642 or 1643, and was there for some time (certainly after 1648) a tutor in the house of the advocate Andreas Barthold, whose daughter (Anna Maria, b. May 19, 1622, d. March 5, 1668) became his wife in 1655. During this period he seems to have frequently preached in Berlin. He was appoint… Go to person page >

Translator: J. Kelly

Kelly, John, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, educated at Glasgow University, studied theology at Bonn, New College, Edinburgh, and the Theological College of the English Presbyterian Church (to which body he belongs) in London. He has ministered to congregations at Hebburn-on-Tyne and Streatham, and was Tract Editor of the Religious Tract Society. His translations of Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs were published in 1867. Every piece is given in full, and rendered in the metre of the originals. His Hymns of the Present Century from the German were published in 1886 by the Religious Tract Society. In these translations the metres of the originals have not always been followed, whilst some of the hymns have been abridged and others condens… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Is God for me? t'oppose me
Title: A Song of Christian Consolation and Joy
German Title: Ist Gott fuer mich, so trete
Translator: J. Kelly (1867)
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Meter: 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6
Language: English
Publication Date: 1867
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.



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