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Lift up to God the voice of praise

Full Text

1. Lift up to God the voice of praise,
Whose breath our souls inspired;
Loud and more loud the anthem raise,
With grateful ardor fired.

2. Lift up to God the voice of praise,
Whose tender care sustains
Our feeble frame, encompassed round
With death’s unnumbered pains.

3. Lift up to God the voice of praise
Whose goodness, passing thought,
Loads every minute, as it flies,
With benefits unsought.

4. Lift up to God the voice of praise
From whom salvation flows;
Who sent His Son our souls to save
From everlasting woes.

5. Lift up to God the voice of praise,
For hope’s transporting ray,
Which lights through darkest shades of death
To realms of endless day.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #4073

Author: Ralph Wardlaw

Wardlaw, Ralph, D.D. This venerable and (in his generation) influential Scottish divine contributed twelve hymns to the praise of the Church Universal that are likely to live in a humble and useful way. As having so done, and besides edited several collections of hymns, he claims a place of honour in this work. Critically, and regarded as literature, his hymns have little of poetry in them; no "winged words" to lift the soul heavenward. They reflect simply and plainly the lights and shadows of everyday experiences of the spiritual life, rather than its etherialities and subtleties. His "Lift up to God the voice of praise " is the most widely known; and there is a certain inspiriting clangour about it when well sung; yet it is commonplace. H… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Lift up to God the voice of praise
Author: Ralph Wardlaw

Tune

BEATI IMMACULATI


ALENA


ST. MAGNUS (Clarke)

ST. MAGNUS first appeared in Henry Playford's Divine Companion (1707 ed.) as an anonymous tune with soprano and bass parts. The tune was later credited to Jeremiah Clark (b. London, England, c. 1670; d. London, 1707), who was a chorister in the Chapel Royal and sang at the coronation of James II in…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4073
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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