My Savior, how shall I proclaim

Representative Text

1 My Saviour, how shall I proclaim,
How pay the mighty debt I owe?
Let all I have, and all I am,
Ceaseless to all thy glory show.

2 Too much to thee I can not give;
Too much I can not do for thee;
Let all thy love, and all thy grief,
Graven on my heart for ever be.

3 The meek, the still, the lowly mind,
Oh, may I learn from thee, my God!
And love, with softest pity joined,
For those that trample on thy blood!

4 Still let thy tears, thy groans, thy sighs
O'erflow my eyes, and heave my breast;
Till, loose from flesh and earth, I rise,
And ever in thy bosom rest.

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #815

Translator: John Wesley

John Wesley, the son of Samuel, and brother of Charles Wesley, was born at Epworth, June 17, 1703. He was educated at the Charterhouse, London, and at Christ Church, Oxford. He became a Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford, and graduated M.A. in 1726. At Oxford, he was one of the small band consisting of George Whitefield, Hames Hervey, Charles Wesley, and a few others, who were even then known for their piety; they were deridingly called "Methodists." After his ordination he went, in 1735, on a mission to Georgia. The mission was not successful, and he returned to England in 1738. From that time, his life was one of great labour, preaching the Gospel, and publishing his commentaries and other theological works. He died in London, in 17… Go to person page >

Author: Paul Gerhardt

Paul Gerhardt (b. GraEenhainichen, Saxony, Germany, 1607; d. Lubben, Germany, 1676), famous author of Lutheran evangelical hymns, studied theology and hymnody at the University of Wittenberg and then was a tutor in Berlin, where he became friends with Johann Crüger. He served the Lutheran parish of Mittenwalde near Berlin (1651-1657) and the great St. Nicholas' Church in Berlin (1657-1666). Friederich William, the Calvinist elector, had issued an edict that forbade the various Protestant groups to fight each other. Although Gerhardt did not want strife between the churches, he refused to comply with the edict because he thought it opposed the Lutheran "Formula of Concord," which con­demned some Calvinist doctrines. Consequently, he was re… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My Savior, how shall I proclaim
Translator: John Wesley
Author: Paul Gerhardt

Tune

EISENACH (Gesius)

MACHS MIT MIR was first published in the collection of music Das ander Theil des andern newen Operis Geistlicher Deutscher Lieder (1605) by Bartholomäus Gesius (b. Münchenberg, near Frankfurt, Germany, c. 1555; d. Frankfurt, 1613). A prolific composer, Gesius wrote almost exclusively for the churc…

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MONTGOMERY (Jarvis, Stanley)


ANGELS' HYMN


Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

Hymns and Psalms #743

Include 17 pre-1979 instances
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