Death and Glory

My soul, come meditate the day, And think how near it stands

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 116 hymnals

Representative Text

My soul, come meditate the day,
And think how near it stands,
When thou must quit this house of clay,
And fly to unknown lands.

[And you, mine eyes, look down and view
The hollow, gaping tomb;
This gloomy prison waits for you,
Whene'er the summons come.]

O could we die with those that die,
And place us in their stead,
Then would our spirits learn to fly,
And converse with the dead:

Then should we see the saints above
In their own glorious forms,
And wonder why our souls should love
To dwell with mortal worms.

[How we should scorn these clothes of flesh,
These fetters, and this load!
And long for ev'ning to undress,
That we may rest with God.]

We should almost forsake our clay
Before the summons come,
And pray and wish our souls away
To their eternal home.



Source: Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The #II.61

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My soul, come meditate the day, And think how near it stands
Title: Death and Glory
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Sacred Harp #440

Include 115 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.