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Night had fallen on the city

Night had fallen on the city

Author: Philip P. Bliss
Tune: [Night had fallen on the city]
Published in 8 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Night had fallen on the city,
And the streets at last were still,
Where the noisy throng the day-long,
Did the air with shoutings fill.
And the weary wayworn travelers
Preaching Jesus thro’ the land,
Were in deepest dungeon darkness,
At the magistrates’ command.

2 Many stripes to them were given
Many curses on them cast;
Many bolts and bars surround them,
In the stocks their feet were fast.
While the trusty Roman jailer,
All securely slumbering on,
Little dreamed the mighty wonder
Of the morrow’s early dawn.

3 Hark the sighing of the prisoners,
Hear their moanings loud and long;
No, again, and louder, clearer,
’Tis the voice of prayer and song.
See, the prison walls are shaking,
And the door wide open stands;
Lo, the earth, the earth is quaking,
Loosed are every prisoner’s bands.

4 Oh, there’s not a cell so lonely,
But a song may echo there;
Oh, there’s not a night so cheerless,
But there’s potency in prayer.
Sing, oh sing, thou weary pilgrim,
Song will bring thee heav’nly peace,
Pray, oh pray, thou burdened prisoner,
God will give thee sweet release.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #11730

Author: Philip P. Bliss

Bliss, Philip, b. at Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1838. In 1864 he went to Chicago in the employ of Dr. George F. Root, the musician, where he was engaged in conducting musical Institutes, and in composing Sunday School melodies. Originally a Methodist, he became, about 1871, a choirman of the First Congregational Church, Chicago, and the Superintendent of its Sunday Schools. In 1874 he joined D. W. Whittle in evangelical work. To this cause he gave (although a poor man) the royalty of his Gospel Songs, which was worth some thirty thousand dollars. His death was sudden. It occurred in the railway disaster at Ashtabula, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1876. He had escaped from the car, but lost his life in trying to save his wife. His hymns are n… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Night had fallen on the city
Author: Philip P. Bliss

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #11730
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The Cyber Hymnal #11730TextScoreAudio
Include 7 pre-1979 instances
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