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Now Lay We Calmly in the Grave

Representative Text

1 Now lay we calmly in the grave
This form, whereof no doubt we have
That it shall rise again that day
In glorious triumph o'er decay.

2 And so to earth we hear entrust
What came from dust and turns to dust,
And from the dust shall surely rise
When the last trumpet fills the skies.

3 This soul forever lives in God
Whose grace His pardon hath bestowed,
Who through His Son redeemed us here
From bondage to both sin and fear.

4 So help us, Christ, our Hope in loss,
Thou hast redeemed us by Thy cross
From endless death and misery;
We praise, we bless, we worship Thee.



Source: Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #476

Author: Michael Weisse

Michael Weiss was born at Neisse, in Silesia. He was a pastor among the Bohemian Brethren, and a contemporary with Luther. His hymns have received commendation. He died in 1540. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Tune

NUN LASST UNS DEN LEIB


FEDERAL STREET

Henry Kemble Oliver (b. Beverly, MA, 1800; d. Salem, MA, 1885) composed FEDERAL STREET in 1832, possibly as an imitation of earlier psalm tunes in long meter. He took it to a music class taught by Lowell Mason (who may have contributed to the harmony); Mason (PHH 96) published it in his Boston Acade…

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CHRIST, THOU ART THE LIGHT OF DAY


Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
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Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #476

Include 21 pre-1979 instances
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