Why Not Come Now?

O brother, why longer now tarry

Author: James E. Hawes
Tune: [O, brother, why longer now tarry]
Published in 2 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

Oh, brother, why longer now tarry
Away from the Father’s home?
Thy Savior is tenderly calling,
Oh, will you not to Him come?

Chorus:
Why not? Why not?
Why not come to Him now?
Oh, why not? why not?
Why not come to Him now?

The Father in mercy is pleading,
His love is so full and free;
The gates of the city stand open,
A welcome there waits for thee.

The Spirit has brought thee a message
‘Tis “Whosoever may come.”
Oh, hast while the day-beams are shining,
Prepare for that heav’nly home.

Thy friends and thy loved ones are praying,
For thee do they watch and wait;
Oh, come and be cleansed in the fountain,
Come, enter that golden gate.


Source: Twentieth (20th) Century Songs Part One #3

Author: James E. Hawes

James Edward Hawes was born in Vermillion County, IL, near Danville, on Aug. 18, 1862. While growing up, he was nicknamed “the preacher” because of his exceptional moral life. Evidently he became a well-known song leader among churches of Christ and Christian Churches in the latter part of the nineteenth century and into the early twentieth century, as well as a preacher. Hawes formed an evangelistic team about 1885, after the example of Dwight L. Moody and Ira D. Sankey, with Jacob V. Updike (1850-1907). They met with great success before disbanding to become located ministers. According to The Christian Evangelist of Dec. 16, 1901, Hawes was located as minister with the Church of Christ in Greenwich, OH. Also, Hawes edited a hymnbook… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O brother, why longer now tarry
Title: Why Not Come Now?
Author: James E. Hawes
Refrain First Line: Why not? Why not?
Publication Date: 1900
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

The Gospel Invitation #d55

TextAudioPage Scan

Twentieth (20th) Century Songs Part One #3

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