O Lord, I sing with lips and heart

Representative Text

1 O Lord, I sing with mouth and heart,
Joy of my soul, to Thee;
To earth Thy knowledge I impart
As it is known to me.

2 Thou art the Fount of grace, I know,
And Spring so full and free
Whence saving health and goodness flow
Each day so bounteously.

3 For what have all that live and move
Thro' this wide world below
That does not from Thy bounteous love,
O heav'nly Father, flow!

4 Who built the lofty firmament?
Who spread th'expanse of blue?
By whom are to our pastures sent
Refreshing rain and dew?

5 Who warmeth us in cold and rain?
Who shields us from the wind?
Who orders it that fruit and grain
We in their season find?

6 Who is it life and health bestows?
Who keeps us with His hand
In golden peace, wards off war’s woes
From our dear native land?

7 O Lord, of this and all our store
Thou art the Author blest;
Thou keepest watch before our door
While we securely rest.

8 Thou feedest us from year to year
And constant dost abide;
With ready help in time of fear
Thou standest at our side.

9 Our deepest need dost Thou supply,
And all that lasts for aye;
Thou leadest us to our home on high
When hence we pass away.

Amen.

Source: The Lutheran Hymnal #569

Author: Paul Gerhardt

Paul Gerhardt (b. GraEenhainichen, Saxony, Germany, 1607; d. Lubben, Germany, 1676), famous author of Lutheran evangelical hymns, studied theology and hymnody at the University of Wittenberg and then was a tutor in Berlin, where he became friends with Johann Crüger. He served the Lutheran parish of Mittenwalde near Berlin (1651-1657) and the great St. Nicholas' Church in Berlin (1657-1666). Friederich William, the Calvinist elector, had issued an edict that forbade the various Protestant groups to fight each other. Although Gerhardt did not want strife between the churches, he refused to comply with the edict because he thought it opposed the Lutheran "Formula of Concord," which con­demned some Calvinist doctrines. Consequently, he was re… Go to person page >

Translator: John Kelly

Kelly, John, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, educated at Glasgow University, studied theology at Bonn, New College, Edinburgh, and the Theological College of the English Presbyterian Church (to which body he belongs) in London. He has ministered to congregations at Hebburn-on-Tyne and Streatham, and was Tract Editor of the Religious Tract Society. His translations of Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs were published in 1867. Every piece is given in full, and rendered in the metre of the originals. His Hymns of the Present Century from the German were published in 1886 by the Religious Tract Society. In these translations the metres of the originals have not always been followed, whilst some of the hymns have been abridged and others condens… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O Lord, I sing with lips and heart
German Title: Lobt Gott, ihr Christen, allzugleich
Translator: John Kelly (1867)
Author: Paul Gerhardt
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 19 of 19)
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American Lutheran Hymnal #495

Book of Hymns for the Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Wisconsin and Other States #d190

Book of Hymns for the joint Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and other states #d188

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn Book with Tunes #d333

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #292

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-book #323

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal #364

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal. 9th ed. #a364

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Evangelical Lutheran hymnal #364a

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Evangelical Lutheran hymnal #364b

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnbook (Lutheran Conference of Missouri and Other States) #d258

Text

Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs #54

Select Songs for School and Home #d107

Songs of Light #34

Songs of Praise #d224

Songs of Praise for Sunday Schools, Church Societies and the Home #d229

TextPage Scan

The Lutheran Hymnal #569

The Selah Song Book (Das Sela Gesangbuch) #d572

The Selah Song Book. Word ed. #d282

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