I never could do without Jesus

O what could I do with my sorrows

Author: Rev. R. M. Offord
Tune: [O what could I do with my sorrows]
Published in 1 hymnal

Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Oh, what could I do with my sorrows,
And how could I carry my care,
If I had not a Saviour most tender,
Who helps me my burdens to bear?

Refrain:
I never could do without Jesus,
I never could carry my care,
If I had not this Saviour so wiling
My sorrows and troubles to share.

2 Oh, many a time am I weary,
And many a time am I tried;
But I just go at once to my Saviour,
And all to His love I confide. [Refrain]

3 I tell Him the whole of my trouble,
In patience my story is heard;
Oh, He’s better than parent or brother,
He listens to catch ev’ry word. [Refrain]

4 These talks that I have with my Saviour,
They give me fresh strength for my day;
Like a giant refresh’d from his slumber,
I rise and go forth on my way. [Refrain]

5 He says that He never will leave me,
My helper and guide He will be,
Till I reach the bright home in glory
Which love is preparing for me. [Refrain]

Source: Alexander's New Revival Hymnal: as used at the Torrey-Alexander meetings #134

Author: Rev. R. M. Offord

Offord, Robert M., son of an English "open-communion" Baptist, was born at St. Austell, Cornwall, Sept. 17, 1846. In 1870 he removed to America, where he was associated for some time with the Methodists, but subsequently joined the Reformed Dutch Church in 1878. He is editor of the New York Observer. To that paper he contributed:— 1. Jesus, heed me, lost and dying. Lent. 2. It is no untried way. Christ's Burden. No. 1 appeared on Jan. 25th, and No. 2 on Feb. 1st, 1883. They were revised for Laudes Domini, N. Y., 1884 (Duffield's English Hymns, N. Y., 1886). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O what could I do with my sorrows
Title: I never could do without Jesus
Author: Rev. R. M. Offord
Language: English
Refrain First Line: I never could do without Jesus
Publication Date: 1922
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.



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