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On the waters dark and dreary

On the waters dark and dreary

Author: W. Chatterton Dix
Tune: PLEYEL'S HYMN
Published in 5 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. On the waters dark and drear,
Jesus, Savior, Thou art near,
With our ship where’er it roam,
As with loving friends at home.

2. Thou hast walked the heaving wave;
Thou art mighty still to save;
With one gentle word of peace
Thou canst bid the tempest cease.

3. Safely from the boisterous main
Bring us back to port again;
In our haven we shall be,
Jesu, if we have but Thee.

4. Only by Thy power and love
Fit us for the port above;
Still the deadly storm within,
Gusts of passion, waves of sin.

5. So, when breaks the glorious dawn
Of the resurrection morn,
When the night of toil is o’er,
We shall see Thee on the shore.

6. Holy Father, Holy Son,
Holy Spirit, Three in One,
Praise unending unto Thee,
Now and evermore shall be.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #5504

Author: W. Chatterton Dix

Dix, William Chatterton, son of John Dix, surgeon, of Bristol, author of the Life of Chatterton; Local Legends, &c, born at Bristol, June 14, 1837, and educated at the Grammar School of that city. Mr. Chatterton Dix's contributions to modern hymnody are numerous and of value. His fine Epiphany hymn, "As with gladness men of old,” and his plaintive ”Come unto Me, ye weary," are examples of his compositions, many of which rank high amongst modern hymns. In his Hymns of Love and Joy, 1861, Altar Songs, Verses on the Holy Eucharist, 1867; Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871; and Seekers of a City, 1878, some of his compositions were first published. The greater part, however, were contributed to Hymns Ancient & Modern; St. Raphaels Hymnbook, 186… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: On the waters dark and dreary
Author: W. Chatterton Dix

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #5504
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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