Return, my soul, and seek thy rest

Return, my soul, and seek thy rest

Author: Philip Doddridge
Tune: DEUS TUORUM MILITUM
Published in 16 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Return, my soul, and seek thy rest
Upon thy heav’nly Father’s breast:
Indulge me, Lord, in that repose,
The soul which loves Thee only knows.

2 Lodged in Thine arms I fear no more
The tempest’s howl, the billows’ roar;
Those storms must shake th’Almighty’s seat,
Which violate the saints’ retreat.

3 Thy bounties, Lord, to me surmount
The power of language to recount;
From morning dawn, the setting sun
Sees but my work of praise begun.

4 The mercies, all my moments bring,
Ask an eternity to sing;
What thanks those mercies can suffice
Which thro’ eternity shall rise?

5 Rich in ten thousand gifts possessed,
In future hopes more richly blessed,
I’ll sit and sing, till death shall raise
A note of more proportioned praise.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #10621

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Return, my soul, and seek thy rest
Author: Philip Doddridge

Tune

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (sometimes called GRENOBLE) was published in France in the 1753 Grenoble Antiphoner as a setting for the text "Deus tuorum militum" (“The God of Your Soldiers”). One of the finest French diocesan tunes from the eighteenth century, it represents a departure in Roman Catholic h…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #10621
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #10621

Include 15 pre-1979 instances
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