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The Star Proclaims the King Is Here

Representative Text

1 The star proclaims the King is here;
But, Herod, why this senseless fear?
For He who offers heav'nly birth
Seeks not the kingdoms of this earth.

2 The eastern sages saw from far
And followed on His guiding star;
And, led by light, to light they trod
And by their gifts confessed their God.

3 Within the Jordan's sacred flood
The heav'nly Lamb in meekness stood
That He, of whom no sin was known,
Might cleanse His people from their own.

4 And oh, what miracle divine,
When water reddened into wine!
He spoke the word, and forth it flowed
In streams that nature ne'er bestowed.

5 For this Thy glad epiphany
All glory, Jesus, be to Thee,
Whom with the Father we adore,
And Holy Spirit evermore.

Source: Lutheran Service Book #399

Author: Sedulius, Coelius

Sedulius, Coelius. The known facts concerning this poet, as contained in his two letters to Macedonius, are, that in early life, he devoted himself to heathen literature; that comparatively late in life he was converted to Christianity; and that amongst his friends were Gallieanus and Perpetua. The place of his birth is generally believed to have been Rome; and the date when he flourished 450. For this date the evidence is, that he referred to the Commentaries of Jerome, who died 420; is praised by Cassiodorus, who d. 575, and by Gelasius, who was pope from 492 to 496. His works were collected, after his death, by Asterius, who was consul in 494. They are (1) Carmen Paschale, a poem which treats of the whole Gospel story; (2) Opus Paschale,… Go to person page >

Translator: John Mason Neale

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Tune

WO GOTT ZUM HAUS


O HEILAND, REISS DIE HIMMEL AUF

O HEILAND, REISS DIE HIMMEL AUF is a German chorale melody published anonymously in Rheinfelsisches Deutsches Catholisches Gesangbuch (1666 ed.). Psalter Hymnal Revision Committee member Dale Grotenhuis (PHH 4) prepared the harmonization in 1985. The tune is in Dorian mode and exhibits two main rhyt…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #6323
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)
TextPage Scan

Christian Worship #91

TextPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #173

TextPage Scan

Lutheran Service Book #399

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #6323

Include 4 pre-1979 instances
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