The sun ascending

Representative Text

1 The sun ascending
To us is lending
New joy and gladness,
Cure for all sadness,
Filling the world with its rich, golden light.
I was reclining,
And no light was shining;
But the sun's beauty
Now calls me to duty,
As I behold it so fair and so bright.

2 To God in heaven
All praise be given!
Come, let us offer
And gladly proffer
To the Creator the gifts He doth prize.
He well receiveth
A heart that believeth;
Hymns that adore Him
Are precious before Him
And to His throne like sweet incense arise.

3 Father above me,
Thou who dost love me,
Bless my beginning,
Keep me from sinning,
Move ev'ry hindrance well out of my way.
Strength ever lend me,
From Satan defend me,
Spare me temptation,
So that in my station
I may Thy holy commandments obey.

4 Ills that still grieve me
Soon are to leave me;
Tho' billows tower
And winds gain power,
After the storm the fair sun shows its face.
Joys e'er increasing
And peace never ceasing,
These I shall treasure
And share in full measure
When in yon mansions God grants me a place.

Source: American Lutheran Hymnal #557

Author: Paul Gerhardt

Paul Gerhardt (b. Gräfenheinichen, Saxony, Germany, 1607; d. Lubben, Germany, 1676), famous author of Lutheran evangelical hymns, studied theology and hymnody at the University of Wittenberg and then was a tutor in Berlin, where he became friends with Johann Crüger. He served the Lutheran parish of Mittenwalde near Berlin (1651-1657) and the great St. Nicholas' Church in Berlin (1657-1666). Friederich William, the Calvinist elector, had issued an edict that forbade the various Protestant groups to fight each other. Although Gerhardt did not want strife between the churches, he refused to comply with the edict because he thought it opposed the Lutheran "Formula of Concord," which con­demned some Calvinist doctrines. Consequently, he was r… Go to person page >

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First Line: The sun ascending
Author: Paul Gerhardt

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American Lutheran Hymnal #557

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